Hepatitis g virus co-infection in liver transplantation recipients with chronic hepatitis c and nonviral chronic liver disease

Michael W. Fried, Yuri E. Khudyakov, Gregory A. Smallwood, Mion E R Cong, Barbara Nichols, Emma Diaz, Paul Siefert, Karen Gutekunst, Robert D. Gordon, Thomas D Boyer, Howard A. Fields

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Hepatitis G virus (HGV) is a newly described RNA virus that is parenterally transmitted and has been found frequently in patients with chronic hepatitis C infection. To determine the impact of hepatitis G virus co-infection on morbidity and mortality following liver transplantation, we measured HGV RNA by polymerase chain reaction in pre and posttransplantation sera from a cohort of patients transplanted for chronic hepatitis C and a control group of patients transplanted for nonviral causes who were negative for hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA in serum. The overall prevalence rate of HGV RNA in transplanted patients with chronic hepatitis C was 20.7%. HGV infection was present before transplantation in 13% while it appeared to have been acquired at the time of transplantation in 7.4%. Mean serum alanine aminotransferase activity, hepatic histological activity, and patient and graft survival were similar between HGV-positive and HGV-negative patients. The prevalence rate of HGV RNA in transplanted controls was 64% (P < .01) with a significantly higher rate of acquisition of HGV infection following transplantation (53%, P < .001) when compared with patients with chronic hepatitis C. Mean serum alanine aminotransferase activity was significantly lower in the control patients with HGV infection alone following transplantation than in patients co-infected with hepatitis C (37 ± 9 vs. 70 ± 33 U/L, P < .01). Thus, HGV is frequently found in transplantation patients co-infected with hepatitis C although it appears to have minimal clinical impact. In patients transplanted for nonviral causes of end-stage liver disease, a high rate of hepatitis G acquisition at the time of transplantation may occur but does not appear to predispose to chronic hepatitis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1271-1275
Number of pages5
JournalHepatology
Volume25
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1997
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

GB virus C
Hepatitis Viruses
Virus Diseases
Chronic Hepatitis
Coinfection
Liver Transplantation
Liver Diseases
Chronic Disease
Transplantation
Chronic Hepatitis C
RNA
Hepatitis C
Serum
Alanine Transaminase
End Stage Liver Disease
RNA Viruses
Graft Survival
DNA-Directed RNA Polymerases
Hepacivirus
Hepatitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hepatology

Cite this

Fried, M. W., Khudyakov, Y. E., Smallwood, G. A., Cong, M. E. R., Nichols, B., Diaz, E., ... Fields, H. A. (1997). Hepatitis g virus co-infection in liver transplantation recipients with chronic hepatitis c and nonviral chronic liver disease. Hepatology, 25(5), 1271-1275.

Hepatitis g virus co-infection in liver transplantation recipients with chronic hepatitis c and nonviral chronic liver disease. / Fried, Michael W.; Khudyakov, Yuri E.; Smallwood, Gregory A.; Cong, Mion E R; Nichols, Barbara; Diaz, Emma; Siefert, Paul; Gutekunst, Karen; Gordon, Robert D.; Boyer, Thomas D; Fields, Howard A.

In: Hepatology, Vol. 25, No. 5, 1997, p. 1271-1275.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fried, MW, Khudyakov, YE, Smallwood, GA, Cong, MER, Nichols, B, Diaz, E, Siefert, P, Gutekunst, K, Gordon, RD, Boyer, TD & Fields, HA 1997, 'Hepatitis g virus co-infection in liver transplantation recipients with chronic hepatitis c and nonviral chronic liver disease', Hepatology, vol. 25, no. 5, pp. 1271-1275.
Fried MW, Khudyakov YE, Smallwood GA, Cong MER, Nichols B, Diaz E et al. Hepatitis g virus co-infection in liver transplantation recipients with chronic hepatitis c and nonviral chronic liver disease. Hepatology. 1997;25(5):1271-1275.
Fried, Michael W. ; Khudyakov, Yuri E. ; Smallwood, Gregory A. ; Cong, Mion E R ; Nichols, Barbara ; Diaz, Emma ; Siefert, Paul ; Gutekunst, Karen ; Gordon, Robert D. ; Boyer, Thomas D ; Fields, Howard A. / Hepatitis g virus co-infection in liver transplantation recipients with chronic hepatitis c and nonviral chronic liver disease. In: Hepatology. 1997 ; Vol. 25, No. 5. pp. 1271-1275.
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AU - Nichols, Barbara

AU - Diaz, Emma

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AU - Boyer, Thomas D

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