Hepatitis g virus co-infection in liver transplantation recipients with chronic hepatitis c and nonviral chronic liver disease

Michael W. Fried, Yuri E. Khudyakov, Gregory A. Smallwood, Mion E.R. Cong, Barbara Nichols, Emma Diaz, Paul Siefert, Karen Gutekunst, Robert D. Gordon, Thomas D. Boyer, Howard A. Fields

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47 Scopus citations

Abstract

Hepatitis G virus (HGV) is a newly described RNA virus that is parenterally transmitted and has been found frequently in patients with chronic hepatitis C infection. To determine the impact of hepatitis G virus co-infection on morbidity and mortality following liver transplantation, we measured HGV RNA by polymerase chain reaction in pre and posttransplantation sera from a cohort of patients transplanted for chronic hepatitis C and a control group of patients transplanted for nonviral causes who were negative for hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA in serum. The overall prevalence rate of HGV RNA in transplanted patients with chronic hepatitis C was 20.7%. HGV infection was present before transplantation in 13% while it appeared to have been acquired at the time of transplantation in 7.4%. Mean serum alanine aminotransferase activity, hepatic histological activity, and patient and graft survival were similar between HGV-positive and HGV-negative patients. The prevalence rate of HGV RNA in transplanted controls was 64% (P < .01) with a significantly higher rate of acquisition of HGV infection following transplantation (53%, P < .001) when compared with patients with chronic hepatitis C. Mean serum alanine aminotransferase activity was significantly lower in the control patients with HGV infection alone following transplantation than in patients co-infected with hepatitis C (37 ± 9 vs. 70 ± 33 U/L, P < .01). Thus, HGV is frequently found in transplantation patients co-infected with hepatitis C although it appears to have minimal clinical impact. In patients transplanted for nonviral causes of end-stage liver disease, a high rate of hepatitis G acquisition at the time of transplantation may occur but does not appear to predispose to chronic hepatitis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1271-1275
Number of pages5
JournalHepatology
Volume25
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hepatology

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    Fried, M. W., Khudyakov, Y. E., Smallwood, G. A., Cong, M. E. R., Nichols, B., Diaz, E., Siefert, P., Gutekunst, K., Gordon, R. D., Boyer, T. D., & Fields, H. A. (1997). Hepatitis g virus co-infection in liver transplantation recipients with chronic hepatitis c and nonviral chronic liver disease. Hepatology, 25(5), 1271-1275. https://doi.org/10.1002/hep.510250536