High drama on the high seas: Peace versus war journalism framing of an Israeli/Palestinian-related incident

Shahira S Fahmy, Britain Eakin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A review of the literature indicates a plethora of studies examining the coverage of Middle Eastern conflicts, but hardly any research has been explicitly framed as being developed from a peace/war journalism perspective. The current study, therefore, represents a substantive effort to remedy this deficiency. It examines the extent to which the 2010 Mavi Marmara incident is framed based on Johan Galtung's classification of peace/war journalism. A content analysis of 156 online stories from Haaretz, The Guardian, and The New York Times suggests that overall differences exist among the war/peace narratives published in the three newspapers. The validity of few peace indicators used also was noted. The authors strongly advocate for the need to redefine indicators for peace journalism to reflect the concept as distinct from objective, and factual reporting.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)86-105
Number of pages20
JournalInternational Communication Gazette
Volume76
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2014

Fingerprint

journalism
drama
Israeli
incident
peace
remedies
content analysis
newspaper
coverage
narrative

Keywords

  • International reporting
  • Israeli/Palestinian conflict
  • Mavi Marmara incident
  • news framing
  • online coverage
  • peace journalism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

High drama on the high seas : Peace versus war journalism framing of an Israeli/Palestinian-related incident. / Fahmy, Shahira S; Eakin, Britain.

In: International Communication Gazette, Vol. 76, No. 1, 02.2014, p. 86-105.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{7820247cd8a945408120f6c1058675b1,
title = "High drama on the high seas: Peace versus war journalism framing of an Israeli/Palestinian-related incident",
abstract = "A review of the literature indicates a plethora of studies examining the coverage of Middle Eastern conflicts, but hardly any research has been explicitly framed as being developed from a peace/war journalism perspective. The current study, therefore, represents a substantive effort to remedy this deficiency. It examines the extent to which the 2010 Mavi Marmara incident is framed based on Johan Galtung's classification of peace/war journalism. A content analysis of 156 online stories from Haaretz, The Guardian, and The New York Times suggests that overall differences exist among the war/peace narratives published in the three newspapers. The validity of few peace indicators used also was noted. The authors strongly advocate for the need to redefine indicators for peace journalism to reflect the concept as distinct from objective, and factual reporting.",
keywords = "International reporting, Israeli/Palestinian conflict, Mavi Marmara incident, news framing, online coverage, peace journalism",
author = "Fahmy, {Shahira S} and Britain Eakin",
year = "2014",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1177/1748048513504046",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "76",
pages = "86--105",
journal = "International Communication Gazette",
issn = "1748-0485",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - High drama on the high seas

T2 - Peace versus war journalism framing of an Israeli/Palestinian-related incident

AU - Fahmy, Shahira S

AU - Eakin, Britain

PY - 2014/2

Y1 - 2014/2

N2 - A review of the literature indicates a plethora of studies examining the coverage of Middle Eastern conflicts, but hardly any research has been explicitly framed as being developed from a peace/war journalism perspective. The current study, therefore, represents a substantive effort to remedy this deficiency. It examines the extent to which the 2010 Mavi Marmara incident is framed based on Johan Galtung's classification of peace/war journalism. A content analysis of 156 online stories from Haaretz, The Guardian, and The New York Times suggests that overall differences exist among the war/peace narratives published in the three newspapers. The validity of few peace indicators used also was noted. The authors strongly advocate for the need to redefine indicators for peace journalism to reflect the concept as distinct from objective, and factual reporting.

AB - A review of the literature indicates a plethora of studies examining the coverage of Middle Eastern conflicts, but hardly any research has been explicitly framed as being developed from a peace/war journalism perspective. The current study, therefore, represents a substantive effort to remedy this deficiency. It examines the extent to which the 2010 Mavi Marmara incident is framed based on Johan Galtung's classification of peace/war journalism. A content analysis of 156 online stories from Haaretz, The Guardian, and The New York Times suggests that overall differences exist among the war/peace narratives published in the three newspapers. The validity of few peace indicators used also was noted. The authors strongly advocate for the need to redefine indicators for peace journalism to reflect the concept as distinct from objective, and factual reporting.

KW - International reporting

KW - Israeli/Palestinian conflict

KW - Mavi Marmara incident

KW - news framing

KW - online coverage

KW - peace journalism

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84892842333&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84892842333&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/1748048513504046

DO - 10.1177/1748048513504046

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84892842333

VL - 76

SP - 86

EP - 105

JO - International Communication Gazette

JF - International Communication Gazette

SN - 1748-0485

IS - 1

ER -