High-Performing Dry Powder Inhalers of Paclitaxel DPPC/DPPG Lung Surfactant-Mimic Multifunctional Particles in Lung Cancer: Physicochemical Characterization, In Vitro Aerosol Dispersion, and Cellular Studies.

Samantha A Meenach, Kimberly W Anderson, J. Zach Hilt, Ronald C McGarry, Heidi M Mansour

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4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Inhalable lung surfactant-based carriers composed of synthetic phospholipids, dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG), along with paclitaxel (PTX), were designed and optimized as respirable dry powders using organic solution co-spray-drying particle engineering design. These materials can be used to deliver and treat a wide variety of pulmonary diseases with this current work focusing on lung cancer. In particular, this is the first time dry powder lung surfactant-based particles have been developed and characterized for this purpose. Comprehensive physicochemical characterization was carried out to analyze the particle morphology, surface structure, solid-state transitions, amorphous character, residual water content, and phospholipid bilayer structure. The particle chemical composition was confirmed using attenuated total reflectance-Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. PTX loading was high, as quantified using UV-VIS spectroscopy, and sustained PTX release was measured over weeks. In vitro cellular characterization on lung cancer cells demonstrated the enhanced chemotherapeutic cytotoxic activity of paclitaxel from co-spray-dried DPPC/DPPG (co-SD DPPC/DPPG) lung surfactant-based carrier particles and the cytotoxicity of the particles via pulmonary cell viability analysis, fluorescent microscopy imaging, and transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) testing at air-interface conditions. In vitro aerosol performance using a Next Generation Impactor™ (NGI™) showed measurable powder deposition on all stages of the NGI and was relatively high on the lower stages (nanometer aerodynamic size). Aerosol dispersion analysis of these high-performing DPIs showed mass median diameters (MMADs) that ranged from 1.9 to 2.3 μm with excellent aerosol dispersion performance as exemplified by high values of emitted dose, fine particle fractions, and respirable fractions.

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Dry Powder Inhalers
1,2-Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine
Paclitaxel
Aerosols
Surface-Active Agents
Lung Neoplasms
Powders
Lung
Phospholipids
Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy
Electric Impedance
Lung Diseases
Microscopy
Spectrum Analysis
Cell Survival
Air
tebufenozide
In Vitro Techniques
1,2-dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol
Water

Cite this

@article{aeca2b26946c460db8d39d04ca07c90d,
title = "High-Performing Dry Powder Inhalers of Paclitaxel DPPC/DPPG Lung Surfactant-Mimic Multifunctional Particles in Lung Cancer: Physicochemical Characterization, In Vitro Aerosol Dispersion, and Cellular Studies.",
abstract = "Inhalable lung surfactant-based carriers composed of synthetic phospholipids, dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG), along with paclitaxel (PTX), were designed and optimized as respirable dry powders using organic solution co-spray-drying particle engineering design. These materials can be used to deliver and treat a wide variety of pulmonary diseases with this current work focusing on lung cancer. In particular, this is the first time dry powder lung surfactant-based particles have been developed and characterized for this purpose. Comprehensive physicochemical characterization was carried out to analyze the particle morphology, surface structure, solid-state transitions, amorphous character, residual water content, and phospholipid bilayer structure. The particle chemical composition was confirmed using attenuated total reflectance-Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. PTX loading was high, as quantified using UV-VIS spectroscopy, and sustained PTX release was measured over weeks. In vitro cellular characterization on lung cancer cells demonstrated the enhanced chemotherapeutic cytotoxic activity of paclitaxel from co-spray-dried DPPC/DPPG (co-SD DPPC/DPPG) lung surfactant-based carrier particles and the cytotoxicity of the particles via pulmonary cell viability analysis, fluorescent microscopy imaging, and transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) testing at air-interface conditions. In vitro aerosol performance using a Next Generation Impactor™ (NGI™) showed measurable powder deposition on all stages of the NGI and was relatively high on the lower stages (nanometer aerodynamic size). Aerosol dispersion analysis of these high-performing DPIs showed mass median diameters (MMADs) that ranged from 1.9 to 2.3 μm with excellent aerosol dispersion performance as exemplified by high values of emitted dose, fine particle fractions, and respirable fractions.",
author = "Meenach, {Samantha A} and Anderson, {Kimberly W} and Hilt, {J. Zach} and McGarry, {Ronald C} and Mansour, {Heidi M}",
year = "2014",
month = "8",
day = "20",
doi = "10.1208/s12249-014-0182-z",
language = "English",
journal = "AAPS PharmSciTech: Theme Issue on Advances in Formulation and Device Technologies in Pulmonary Drug Delivery",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - High-Performing Dry Powder Inhalers of Paclitaxel DPPC/DPPG Lung Surfactant-Mimic Multifunctional Particles in Lung Cancer: Physicochemical Characterization, In Vitro Aerosol Dispersion, and Cellular Studies.

AU - Meenach, Samantha A

AU - Anderson, Kimberly W

AU - Hilt, J. Zach

AU - McGarry, Ronald C

AU - Mansour, Heidi M

PY - 2014/8/20

Y1 - 2014/8/20

N2 - Inhalable lung surfactant-based carriers composed of synthetic phospholipids, dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG), along with paclitaxel (PTX), were designed and optimized as respirable dry powders using organic solution co-spray-drying particle engineering design. These materials can be used to deliver and treat a wide variety of pulmonary diseases with this current work focusing on lung cancer. In particular, this is the first time dry powder lung surfactant-based particles have been developed and characterized for this purpose. Comprehensive physicochemical characterization was carried out to analyze the particle morphology, surface structure, solid-state transitions, amorphous character, residual water content, and phospholipid bilayer structure. The particle chemical composition was confirmed using attenuated total reflectance-Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. PTX loading was high, as quantified using UV-VIS spectroscopy, and sustained PTX release was measured over weeks. In vitro cellular characterization on lung cancer cells demonstrated the enhanced chemotherapeutic cytotoxic activity of paclitaxel from co-spray-dried DPPC/DPPG (co-SD DPPC/DPPG) lung surfactant-based carrier particles and the cytotoxicity of the particles via pulmonary cell viability analysis, fluorescent microscopy imaging, and transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) testing at air-interface conditions. In vitro aerosol performance using a Next Generation Impactor™ (NGI™) showed measurable powder deposition on all stages of the NGI and was relatively high on the lower stages (nanometer aerodynamic size). Aerosol dispersion analysis of these high-performing DPIs showed mass median diameters (MMADs) that ranged from 1.9 to 2.3 μm with excellent aerosol dispersion performance as exemplified by high values of emitted dose, fine particle fractions, and respirable fractions.

AB - Inhalable lung surfactant-based carriers composed of synthetic phospholipids, dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG), along with paclitaxel (PTX), were designed and optimized as respirable dry powders using organic solution co-spray-drying particle engineering design. These materials can be used to deliver and treat a wide variety of pulmonary diseases with this current work focusing on lung cancer. In particular, this is the first time dry powder lung surfactant-based particles have been developed and characterized for this purpose. Comprehensive physicochemical characterization was carried out to analyze the particle morphology, surface structure, solid-state transitions, amorphous character, residual water content, and phospholipid bilayer structure. The particle chemical composition was confirmed using attenuated total reflectance-Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. PTX loading was high, as quantified using UV-VIS spectroscopy, and sustained PTX release was measured over weeks. In vitro cellular characterization on lung cancer cells demonstrated the enhanced chemotherapeutic cytotoxic activity of paclitaxel from co-spray-dried DPPC/DPPG (co-SD DPPC/DPPG) lung surfactant-based carrier particles and the cytotoxicity of the particles via pulmonary cell viability analysis, fluorescent microscopy imaging, and transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) testing at air-interface conditions. In vitro aerosol performance using a Next Generation Impactor™ (NGI™) showed measurable powder deposition on all stages of the NGI and was relatively high on the lower stages (nanometer aerodynamic size). Aerosol dispersion analysis of these high-performing DPIs showed mass median diameters (MMADs) that ranged from 1.9 to 2.3 μm with excellent aerosol dispersion performance as exemplified by high values of emitted dose, fine particle fractions, and respirable fractions.

U2 - 10.1208/s12249-014-0182-z

DO - 10.1208/s12249-014-0182-z

M3 - Article

C2 - 25139763

JO - AAPS PharmSciTech: Theme Issue on Advances in Formulation and Device Technologies in Pulmonary Drug Delivery

JF - AAPS PharmSciTech: Theme Issue on Advances in Formulation and Device Technologies in Pulmonary Drug Delivery

ER -