High-resolution infrared imaging

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The hands and mind of an artist are intimately involved in the creative process of image formation, intrinsically making paintings significantly more complex than photographs to analyze. In spite of this difficulty, several years ago the artist David Hockney and I identified optical evidence within a number of paintings that demonstrated artists began using optical projections as early as c1425-nearly 175 years before Galileo-as aids for producing portions of their images. In the course of our work, Hockney and I developed insights that I have been applying to a new approach to computerized image analysis. Recently I developed and characterized a portable high resolution infrared for capturing additional information from paintings. Because many pigments are semi-transparent in the IR, in a number of cases IR photographs ("reflectograms") have revealed marks made by the artists that had been hidden under paint ever since they were made. I have used this IR camera to capture photographs ("reflectograms") of hundreds of paintings in over a dozen museums on three continents and, in some cases, these reflectograms have provided new insights into decisions the artists made in creating the final images that we see in the visible.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
Volume7782
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010
EventThe Nature of Light: Light in Nature III - San Diego, CA, United States
Duration: Aug 2 2010Aug 2 2010

Other

OtherThe Nature of Light: Light in Nature III
CountryUnited States
CitySan Diego, CA
Period8/2/108/2/10

Fingerprint

High Resolution Imaging
Infrared Imaging
Infrared imaging
Painting
photographs
high resolution
museums
paints
continents
pigments
image analysis
Museums
projection
cameras
Image Analysis
Pigments
Paint
Image analysis
Image processing
Infrared

Keywords

  • David Hockney
  • Image analysis
  • Infrared reflectography
  • Renaissance paintings

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Mathematics
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Falco, C. M. (2010). High-resolution infrared imaging. In Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering (Vol. 7782). [778206] https://doi.org/10.1117/12.863575

High-resolution infrared imaging. / Falco, Charles M.

Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 7782 2010. 778206.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Falco, CM 2010, High-resolution infrared imaging. in Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. vol. 7782, 778206, The Nature of Light: Light in Nature III, San Diego, CA, United States, 8/2/10. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.863575
Falco CM. High-resolution infrared imaging. In Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 7782. 2010. 778206 https://doi.org/10.1117/12.863575
Falco, Charles M. / High-resolution infrared imaging. Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 7782 2010.
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