Hippocampal complex contribution to retention and retrieval of recent and remote episodic and semantic memories: Evidence from behavioral and neuroimaging studies of healthy and brain-damaged people

Morris Moscovitch, Robyn Westmacott, Asaf Gilboa, Donna Rose Addis, R. Shayna Rosenbaum, Indre Viskontas, Sandra Priselac, Eva Svoboda, Marilyne Ziegler, Sandra Black, Fuqiang Gao, Cheryl Grady, Morris Freedman, Stefan Köhler, Larry Leach, Brian Levine, Mary Pat McAndrews, Lynn Nadel, Guy Proulx, Brian RichardsT Lee Ryan, Kathryn Stokes, Gordon Winocur

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

For over a hundred years, it has been accepted that remote memories are less vulnerable to disruption than are recent memories. The standard consolidation model posits that the hippocampus and related structures are temporary memory structures, necessary for acquisition, retention, and retrieval of all explicit (declarative) memories until they are consolidated elsewhere in the brain. We review lesion and neuroimaging evidence showing that important distinctions exist among different types of explicit memory and the structures that mediate them. We argue that retention and retrieval of detailed, vivid autobiographical memories depend on the hippocampal system no matter how long ago they were acquired. Semantic memories, on the other hand, benefit from hippocampal contribution for some time before they can be retrieved independently of the hippocampus. Even semantic memories, however, can have episodic elements associated with them which continue to depend on the hippocampus. In short, the evidence reviewed suggests strongly that the function of the hippocampus (and possibly of related limbic structures) is to help encode, retain, and retrieve experiences, no matter how long ago the events comprising the experience occurred. We conclude that the evidence favors a multiple trace theory (MTT) of memory over the traditional model, and we indicate what future work is needed to resolve disputes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationDynamic Cognitive Processes
PublisherSpringer Tokyo
Pages333-380
Number of pages48
ISBN (Print)4431239995, 9784431239994
DOIs
StatePublished - 2005

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Episodic Memory
Long-Term Memory
Semantics
Neuroimaging
Brain
Hippocampus
Dissent and Disputes
Retention (Psychology)

Keywords

  • Autobiographical Memory
  • Consolidation
  • Episodic Memory
  • Hippocampus
  • Medial Temporal Lobes
  • Semantic Memory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Moscovitch, M., Westmacott, R., Gilboa, A., Addis, D. R., Rosenbaum, R. S., Viskontas, I., ... Winocur, G. (2005). Hippocampal complex contribution to retention and retrieval of recent and remote episodic and semantic memories: Evidence from behavioral and neuroimaging studies of healthy and brain-damaged people. In Dynamic Cognitive Processes (pp. 333-380). Springer Tokyo. https://doi.org/10.1007/4-431-27431-6_14

Hippocampal complex contribution to retention and retrieval of recent and remote episodic and semantic memories : Evidence from behavioral and neuroimaging studies of healthy and brain-damaged people. / Moscovitch, Morris; Westmacott, Robyn; Gilboa, Asaf; Addis, Donna Rose; Rosenbaum, R. Shayna; Viskontas, Indre; Priselac, Sandra; Svoboda, Eva; Ziegler, Marilyne; Black, Sandra; Gao, Fuqiang; Grady, Cheryl; Freedman, Morris; Köhler, Stefan; Leach, Larry; Levine, Brian; McAndrews, Mary Pat; Nadel, Lynn; Proulx, Guy; Richards, Brian; Ryan, T Lee; Stokes, Kathryn; Winocur, Gordon.

Dynamic Cognitive Processes. Springer Tokyo, 2005. p. 333-380.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Moscovitch, M, Westmacott, R, Gilboa, A, Addis, DR, Rosenbaum, RS, Viskontas, I, Priselac, S, Svoboda, E, Ziegler, M, Black, S, Gao, F, Grady, C, Freedman, M, Köhler, S, Leach, L, Levine, B, McAndrews, MP, Nadel, L, Proulx, G, Richards, B, Ryan, TL, Stokes, K & Winocur, G 2005, Hippocampal complex contribution to retention and retrieval of recent and remote episodic and semantic memories: Evidence from behavioral and neuroimaging studies of healthy and brain-damaged people. in Dynamic Cognitive Processes. Springer Tokyo, pp. 333-380. https://doi.org/10.1007/4-431-27431-6_14
Moscovitch, Morris ; Westmacott, Robyn ; Gilboa, Asaf ; Addis, Donna Rose ; Rosenbaum, R. Shayna ; Viskontas, Indre ; Priselac, Sandra ; Svoboda, Eva ; Ziegler, Marilyne ; Black, Sandra ; Gao, Fuqiang ; Grady, Cheryl ; Freedman, Morris ; Köhler, Stefan ; Leach, Larry ; Levine, Brian ; McAndrews, Mary Pat ; Nadel, Lynn ; Proulx, Guy ; Richards, Brian ; Ryan, T Lee ; Stokes, Kathryn ; Winocur, Gordon. / Hippocampal complex contribution to retention and retrieval of recent and remote episodic and semantic memories : Evidence from behavioral and neuroimaging studies of healthy and brain-damaged people. Dynamic Cognitive Processes. Springer Tokyo, 2005. pp. 333-380
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AU - Moscovitch, Morris

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AU - Gilboa, Asaf

AU - Addis, Donna Rose

AU - Rosenbaum, R. Shayna

AU - Viskontas, Indre

AU - Priselac, Sandra

AU - Svoboda, Eva

AU - Ziegler, Marilyne

AU - Black, Sandra

AU - Gao, Fuqiang

AU - Grady, Cheryl

AU - Freedman, Morris

AU - Köhler, Stefan

AU - Leach, Larry

AU - Levine, Brian

AU - McAndrews, Mary Pat

AU - Nadel, Lynn

AU - Proulx, Guy

AU - Richards, Brian

AU - Ryan, T Lee

AU - Stokes, Kathryn

AU - Winocur, Gordon

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