Hippocampal function in avoidance learning and punishment

A. H. Black, Lynn Nadel, J. O'Keefe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

177 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Discusses the effects of hippocampal lesions in avoidance and punishment situations. It is proposed that animals with such lesions cannot process information about places and therefore cannot employ place strategies in avoidance learning and punishment situations; they can only employ cue strategies that involve learning to approach or avoid a cue or to perform a response in the presence of a cue. Intact animals, on the other hand, can employ both place and cue strategies. The data are, to a large extent, consistent with this hypothesis. Implications for theories of learning in situations involving aversive reinforcers are discussed. (125 ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1107-1129
Number of pages23
JournalPsychological Bulletin
Volume84
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1977
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Avoidance Learning
Punishment
Cues
Learning
Avoidance
Lesion
Animals

Keywords

  • hippocampal lesions, place vs cue strategies in avoidance learning & aversive reinforcement, animals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • History and Philosophy of Science

Cite this

Hippocampal function in avoidance learning and punishment. / Black, A. H.; Nadel, Lynn; O'Keefe, J.

In: Psychological Bulletin, Vol. 84, No. 6, 11.1977, p. 1107-1129.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Black, A. H. ; Nadel, Lynn ; O'Keefe, J. / Hippocampal function in avoidance learning and punishment. In: Psychological Bulletin. 1977 ; Vol. 84, No. 6. pp. 1107-1129.
@article{e2bcb8b958cb4f5e8b0a64c398dedf46,
title = "Hippocampal function in avoidance learning and punishment",
abstract = "Discusses the effects of hippocampal lesions in avoidance and punishment situations. It is proposed that animals with such lesions cannot process information about places and therefore cannot employ place strategies in avoidance learning and punishment situations; they can only employ cue strategies that involve learning to approach or avoid a cue or to perform a response in the presence of a cue. Intact animals, on the other hand, can employ both place and cue strategies. The data are, to a large extent, consistent with this hypothesis. Implications for theories of learning in situations involving aversive reinforcers are discussed. (125 ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved).",
keywords = "hippocampal lesions, place vs cue strategies in avoidance learning & aversive reinforcement, animals",
author = "Black, {A. H.} and Lynn Nadel and J. O'Keefe",
year = "1977",
month = "11",
doi = "10.1037/0033-2909.84.6.1107",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "84",
pages = "1107--1129",
journal = "Psychological Bulletin",
issn = "0033-2909",
publisher = "American Psychological Association Inc.",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Hippocampal function in avoidance learning and punishment

AU - Black, A. H.

AU - Nadel, Lynn

AU - O'Keefe, J.

PY - 1977/11

Y1 - 1977/11

N2 - Discusses the effects of hippocampal lesions in avoidance and punishment situations. It is proposed that animals with such lesions cannot process information about places and therefore cannot employ place strategies in avoidance learning and punishment situations; they can only employ cue strategies that involve learning to approach or avoid a cue or to perform a response in the presence of a cue. Intact animals, on the other hand, can employ both place and cue strategies. The data are, to a large extent, consistent with this hypothesis. Implications for theories of learning in situations involving aversive reinforcers are discussed. (125 ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved).

AB - Discusses the effects of hippocampal lesions in avoidance and punishment situations. It is proposed that animals with such lesions cannot process information about places and therefore cannot employ place strategies in avoidance learning and punishment situations; they can only employ cue strategies that involve learning to approach or avoid a cue or to perform a response in the presence of a cue. Intact animals, on the other hand, can employ both place and cue strategies. The data are, to a large extent, consistent with this hypothesis. Implications for theories of learning in situations involving aversive reinforcers are discussed. (125 ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved).

KW - hippocampal lesions, place vs cue strategies in avoidance learning & aversive reinforcement, animals

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0017556440&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0017556440&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1037/0033-2909.84.6.1107

DO - 10.1037/0033-2909.84.6.1107

M3 - Article

C2 - 928572

AN - SCOPUS:0017556440

VL - 84

SP - 1107

EP - 1129

JO - Psychological Bulletin

JF - Psychological Bulletin

SN - 0033-2909

IS - 6

ER -