HIV-1 viral envelope glycoprotein gp120 produces oxidative stress and regulates the functional expression of multidrug resistance protein-1 (Mrp1) in glial cells

Patrick T Ronaldson, Reina Bendayan

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67 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Brain human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection is associated with oxidative stress, which may lead to HIV-1 encephalitis, a chronic neurodegenerative condition. In vitro, oxidative stress can be induced in glial cells by exposure to HIV-1 envelope protein glycoprotein (gp120). Multidrug resistance proteins (Mrps) are known to efflux endogenous substrates (i.e. GSH and GSSG) involved in cellular defense against oxidative stress. Altered GSH/GSSG export may contribute to oxidative damage during HIV-1 encephalitis. At present, it is unknown if gp120 exposure can alter the functional expression of Mrp isoforms. Heat-shock protein 70, inducible nitric oxide synthase, intracellular GSSG, 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein fluorescence, and extracellular nitrite were increased in primary cultures of rat astrocytes triggered with gp120, suggesting an oxidative stress response. RT-PCR and immunoblot analysis demonstrated increased Mrp1 mRNA (2.3-fold) and protein (2.2-fold), respectively, in gp120 treated astrocytes while Mrp4 mRNA or protein expression was not changed. Cellular retention of 2′,7′-bis-(2- carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein, an established Mrp substrate, was reduced (twofold) in gp120-treated astrocytes, suggesting increased Mrp-mediated transport. In addition, GSH and GSSG export were enhanced in gp120-triggered cells. These data suggest that gp120 can up-regulate Mrp1, but not Mrp4, functional expression in cultured astrocytes. Our observation of increased GSH/GSSG efflux in response to gp120 treatment implies that Mrp isoforms may be involved in regulating the oxidative stress response in glial cells.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1298-1313
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Neurochemistry
Volume106
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Oxidative stress
Glutathione Disulfide
P-Glycoprotein
Viruses
Neuroglia
HIV-1
Glycoproteins
Oxidative Stress
Astrocytes
Encephalitis
Human Immunodeficiency Virus env Gene Products
Protein Isoforms
P-Glycoproteins
Messenger RNA
Proteins
HSP70 Heat-Shock Proteins
Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II
Virus Diseases
Substrates
Nitrites

Keywords

  • Astrocytes
  • Glutathione
  • Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 encephalitis
  • Multidrug resistance proteins
  • Oxidative stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

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title = "HIV-1 viral envelope glycoprotein gp120 produces oxidative stress and regulates the functional expression of multidrug resistance protein-1 (Mrp1) in glial cells",
abstract = "Brain human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection is associated with oxidative stress, which may lead to HIV-1 encephalitis, a chronic neurodegenerative condition. In vitro, oxidative stress can be induced in glial cells by exposure to HIV-1 envelope protein glycoprotein (gp120). Multidrug resistance proteins (Mrps) are known to efflux endogenous substrates (i.e. GSH and GSSG) involved in cellular defense against oxidative stress. Altered GSH/GSSG export may contribute to oxidative damage during HIV-1 encephalitis. At present, it is unknown if gp120 exposure can alter the functional expression of Mrp isoforms. Heat-shock protein 70, inducible nitric oxide synthase, intracellular GSSG, 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein fluorescence, and extracellular nitrite were increased in primary cultures of rat astrocytes triggered with gp120, suggesting an oxidative stress response. RT-PCR and immunoblot analysis demonstrated increased Mrp1 mRNA (2.3-fold) and protein (2.2-fold), respectively, in gp120 treated astrocytes while Mrp4 mRNA or protein expression was not changed. Cellular retention of 2′,7′-bis-(2- carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein, an established Mrp substrate, was reduced (twofold) in gp120-treated astrocytes, suggesting increased Mrp-mediated transport. In addition, GSH and GSSG export were enhanced in gp120-triggered cells. These data suggest that gp120 can up-regulate Mrp1, but not Mrp4, functional expression in cultured astrocytes. Our observation of increased GSH/GSSG efflux in response to gp120 treatment implies that Mrp isoforms may be involved in regulating the oxidative stress response in glial cells.",
keywords = "Astrocytes, Glutathione, Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 encephalitis, Multidrug resistance proteins, Oxidative stress",
author = "Ronaldson, {Patrick T} and Reina Bendayan",
year = "2008",
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T1 - HIV-1 viral envelope glycoprotein gp120 produces oxidative stress and regulates the functional expression of multidrug resistance protein-1 (Mrp1) in glial cells

AU - Ronaldson, Patrick T

AU - Bendayan, Reina

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N2 - Brain human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection is associated with oxidative stress, which may lead to HIV-1 encephalitis, a chronic neurodegenerative condition. In vitro, oxidative stress can be induced in glial cells by exposure to HIV-1 envelope protein glycoprotein (gp120). Multidrug resistance proteins (Mrps) are known to efflux endogenous substrates (i.e. GSH and GSSG) involved in cellular defense against oxidative stress. Altered GSH/GSSG export may contribute to oxidative damage during HIV-1 encephalitis. At present, it is unknown if gp120 exposure can alter the functional expression of Mrp isoforms. Heat-shock protein 70, inducible nitric oxide synthase, intracellular GSSG, 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein fluorescence, and extracellular nitrite were increased in primary cultures of rat astrocytes triggered with gp120, suggesting an oxidative stress response. RT-PCR and immunoblot analysis demonstrated increased Mrp1 mRNA (2.3-fold) and protein (2.2-fold), respectively, in gp120 treated astrocytes while Mrp4 mRNA or protein expression was not changed. Cellular retention of 2′,7′-bis-(2- carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein, an established Mrp substrate, was reduced (twofold) in gp120-treated astrocytes, suggesting increased Mrp-mediated transport. In addition, GSH and GSSG export were enhanced in gp120-triggered cells. These data suggest that gp120 can up-regulate Mrp1, but not Mrp4, functional expression in cultured astrocytes. Our observation of increased GSH/GSSG efflux in response to gp120 treatment implies that Mrp isoforms may be involved in regulating the oxidative stress response in glial cells.

AB - Brain human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection is associated with oxidative stress, which may lead to HIV-1 encephalitis, a chronic neurodegenerative condition. In vitro, oxidative stress can be induced in glial cells by exposure to HIV-1 envelope protein glycoprotein (gp120). Multidrug resistance proteins (Mrps) are known to efflux endogenous substrates (i.e. GSH and GSSG) involved in cellular defense against oxidative stress. Altered GSH/GSSG export may contribute to oxidative damage during HIV-1 encephalitis. At present, it is unknown if gp120 exposure can alter the functional expression of Mrp isoforms. Heat-shock protein 70, inducible nitric oxide synthase, intracellular GSSG, 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein fluorescence, and extracellular nitrite were increased in primary cultures of rat astrocytes triggered with gp120, suggesting an oxidative stress response. RT-PCR and immunoblot analysis demonstrated increased Mrp1 mRNA (2.3-fold) and protein (2.2-fold), respectively, in gp120 treated astrocytes while Mrp4 mRNA or protein expression was not changed. Cellular retention of 2′,7′-bis-(2- carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein, an established Mrp substrate, was reduced (twofold) in gp120-treated astrocytes, suggesting increased Mrp-mediated transport. In addition, GSH and GSSG export were enhanced in gp120-triggered cells. These data suggest that gp120 can up-regulate Mrp1, but not Mrp4, functional expression in cultured astrocytes. Our observation of increased GSH/GSSG efflux in response to gp120 treatment implies that Mrp isoforms may be involved in regulating the oxidative stress response in glial cells.

KW - Astrocytes

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