Hook guest houses

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

The first domestic use of the plywood vault is found at the Hook Guest House. This triumph is multi-dimensional, for it continued Rudolph's preoccupation with rationalist modular construction techniques based on standard material dimensions, but also looked toward a broadening of the functionalist legacy of his Harvard education. Rudolph used the integrated formal and structural qualities of the vault to expand the vocabulary inherited from Gropius and Breuer. A buttressed post-and-beam frame is employed to raise the main living space above the landscape and accept the outward thrust produced by the plywood sandwich vaults. The modified trabeated frame is infilled with panels consisting of board siding, fixed glazing, or operable jalousie windows, alternating in response to the interior program of the house.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationPaul Rudolph the Florida Houses
PublisherPrinceton Archit.Press
Pages151-211
Number of pages61
ISBN (Print)1568985517, 9781568985510
DOIs
StatePublished - 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Plywood
Hooks
Modular construction
Interiors (building)
Education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Domin, C. J. (2005). Hook guest houses. In Paul Rudolph the Florida Houses (pp. 151-211). Princeton Archit.Press. https://doi.org/10.1007/1-56898-647-5_5

Hook guest houses. / Domin, Christopher J.

Paul Rudolph the Florida Houses. Princeton Archit.Press, 2005. p. 151-211.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Domin, CJ 2005, Hook guest houses. in Paul Rudolph the Florida Houses. Princeton Archit.Press, pp. 151-211. https://doi.org/10.1007/1-56898-647-5_5
Domin CJ. Hook guest houses. In Paul Rudolph the Florida Houses. Princeton Archit.Press. 2005. p. 151-211 https://doi.org/10.1007/1-56898-647-5_5
Domin, Christopher J. / Hook guest houses. Paul Rudolph the Florida Houses. Princeton Archit.Press, 2005. pp. 151-211
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