Hospital privileges for family physicians at university hospitals

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Of the more than 350 family practice residency programs in the United States, 72 are affiliated with a medical school. Seventy-eight percent of these university programs hospitalize all or some of their patients at a university hospital. These hospitals grant various privileges to family physicians with the following frequencies: general medicine (94 percent), adult intensive care (50 percent), coronary care (65 percent), general pediatrics (81 percent), pediatric intensive care (29 percent), normal newborn nursery (79 percent), intensive care nursery (12 percent), routine obstetrics (77 percent), and high-risk obstetrics (31 percent). Sixteen (22 percent) of the university-based programs do not use a university hospital at all, either because the university hospital is too far away or because there is no university hospital. Only one program does not use the university hospital because of difficulty in obtaining privileges. Family physicians are unable to obtain various hospital privileges because of political reasons at the following percentages of university hospitals: general medicine (2 percent), adult intensive care (33 percent), coronary care (40 percent), general pediatrics (8 percent), pediatric intensive care (31 percent), newborn nursery (8 percent), intensive care nursery (29 percent), routine obstetrics (13 percent), and high-risk obstetrics (17 percent).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)747-753
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Family Practice
Volume18
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1984

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Family Physicians
Critical Care
Nurseries
Obstetrics
Pediatrics
Newborn Infant
Hospital Medicine
Family Practice
Internship and Residency
Medical Schools
Medicine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Hospital privileges for family physicians at university hospitals. / Weiss, Barry D.

In: Journal of Family Practice, Vol. 18, No. 5, 1984, p. 747-753.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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