Hostile Media Perceptions in the Age of Social Media: Following Politicians, Emotions, and Perceptions of Media Bias

Brian E. Weeks, Dam Hee Kim, Lauren B. Hahn, Trevor H. Diehl, Nojin Kwak

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Hostile media perceptions are prominent today but little research has examined how social media use contributes to these beliefs. This study examines whether following politicians’ social media feeds is indirectly linked to hostile media perceptions by evoking emotional responses in the audience. We test this possibility by analyzing two-wave panel survey data collected in the United States during the 2016 presidential election. Following politicians on social media is associated with anger at the presidential candidate individuals oppose and enthusiasm for their supported candidate, both of which are subsequently related to hostile media perceptions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)374-392
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Broadcasting and Electronic Media
Volume63
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 3 2019

Fingerprint

social media
politician
emotion
trend
candidacy
presidential election
anger

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication

Cite this

Hostile Media Perceptions in the Age of Social Media : Following Politicians, Emotions, and Perceptions of Media Bias. / Weeks, Brian E.; Kim, Dam Hee; Hahn, Lauren B.; Diehl, Trevor H.; Kwak, Nojin.

In: Journal of Broadcasting and Electronic Media, Vol. 63, No. 3, 03.07.2019, p. 374-392.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{5c8f5bd8a33b4cbe9e77689833f99171,
title = "Hostile Media Perceptions in the Age of Social Media: Following Politicians, Emotions, and Perceptions of Media Bias",
abstract = "Hostile media perceptions are prominent today but little research has examined how social media use contributes to these beliefs. This study examines whether following politicians’ social media feeds is indirectly linked to hostile media perceptions by evoking emotional responses in the audience. We test this possibility by analyzing two-wave panel survey data collected in the United States during the 2016 presidential election. Following politicians on social media is associated with anger at the presidential candidate individuals oppose and enthusiasm for their supported candidate, both of which are subsequently related to hostile media perceptions.",
author = "Weeks, {Brian E.} and Kim, {Dam Hee} and Hahn, {Lauren B.} and Diehl, {Trevor H.} and Nojin Kwak",
year = "2019",
month = "7",
day = "3",
doi = "10.1080/08838151.2019.1653069",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "63",
pages = "374--392",
journal = "Journal of Broadcasting and Electronic Media",
issn = "0883-8151",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Hostile Media Perceptions in the Age of Social Media

T2 - Following Politicians, Emotions, and Perceptions of Media Bias

AU - Weeks, Brian E.

AU - Kim, Dam Hee

AU - Hahn, Lauren B.

AU - Diehl, Trevor H.

AU - Kwak, Nojin

PY - 2019/7/3

Y1 - 2019/7/3

N2 - Hostile media perceptions are prominent today but little research has examined how social media use contributes to these beliefs. This study examines whether following politicians’ social media feeds is indirectly linked to hostile media perceptions by evoking emotional responses in the audience. We test this possibility by analyzing two-wave panel survey data collected in the United States during the 2016 presidential election. Following politicians on social media is associated with anger at the presidential candidate individuals oppose and enthusiasm for their supported candidate, both of which are subsequently related to hostile media perceptions.

AB - Hostile media perceptions are prominent today but little research has examined how social media use contributes to these beliefs. This study examines whether following politicians’ social media feeds is indirectly linked to hostile media perceptions by evoking emotional responses in the audience. We test this possibility by analyzing two-wave panel survey data collected in the United States during the 2016 presidential election. Following politicians on social media is associated with anger at the presidential candidate individuals oppose and enthusiasm for their supported candidate, both of which are subsequently related to hostile media perceptions.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85073228685&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85073228685&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/08838151.2019.1653069

DO - 10.1080/08838151.2019.1653069

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85073228685

VL - 63

SP - 374

EP - 392

JO - Journal of Broadcasting and Electronic Media

JF - Journal of Broadcasting and Electronic Media

SN - 0883-8151

IS - 3

ER -