Host–Microbiota interplay in mediating immune disorders

Krysta M. Felix, Shekha Tahsin, Hsin-Jung Joyce Wu

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To maintain health, the immune system must maintain a delicate balance between eliminating invading pathogens and avoiding immune disorders such as autoimmunity and allergies. The gut microbiota provide essential health benefits to the host, particularly by regulating immune homeostasis. Dysbiosis, an alteration and imbalance of the gut microbiota, is associated with the development of several autoimmune diseases in both mice and humans. In this review, we discuss recent advances in understanding how certain factors, such as age and gender, affect the gut microbiota, which in turn can influence the development of autoimmune diseases. The age factor in microbiota-dependent immune disorders indicates a window of opportunity for future diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. We also discuss unique commensal bacteria with strong immunomodulatory activity. Finally, we provide an overview of the potential molecular mechanisms whereby gut microbiota induce autoimmunity, as well as the evidence that gut microbiota trigger extraintestinal diseases by inducing the migration of gut-derived immune cells. Elucidating the interaction of gut microbiota and the host immune system will help us understand the pathogenesis of immune disorders, and provide us with new foundations to develop novel immuno-or microbe-targeted therapies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)57-70
Number of pages14
JournalAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Volume1417
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

Fingerprint

Immune System Diseases
Immune system
Health
Allergies
Pathogens
Autoimmunity
Autoimmune Diseases
Immune System
Bacteria
Dysbiosis
Age Factors
Microbiota
Insurance Benefits
Gastrointestinal Microbiome
Hypersensitivity
Homeostasis
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Age effect
  • Autoimmunity
  • Innate and adaptive immunity
  • Microbiota

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • History and Philosophy of Science

Cite this

Host–Microbiota interplay in mediating immune disorders. / Felix, Krysta M.; Tahsin, Shekha; Wu, Hsin-Jung Joyce.

In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, Vol. 1417, No. 1, 01.01.2016, p. 57-70.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

@article{0b4c4994b86c4709af0e6e5c99282818,
title = "Host–Microbiota interplay in mediating immune disorders",
abstract = "To maintain health, the immune system must maintain a delicate balance between eliminating invading pathogens and avoiding immune disorders such as autoimmunity and allergies. The gut microbiota provide essential health benefits to the host, particularly by regulating immune homeostasis. Dysbiosis, an alteration and imbalance of the gut microbiota, is associated with the development of several autoimmune diseases in both mice and humans. In this review, we discuss recent advances in understanding how certain factors, such as age and gender, affect the gut microbiota, which in turn can influence the development of autoimmune diseases. The age factor in microbiota-dependent immune disorders indicates a window of opportunity for future diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. We also discuss unique commensal bacteria with strong immunomodulatory activity. Finally, we provide an overview of the potential molecular mechanisms whereby gut microbiota induce autoimmunity, as well as the evidence that gut microbiota trigger extraintestinal diseases by inducing the migration of gut-derived immune cells. Elucidating the interaction of gut microbiota and the host immune system will help us understand the pathogenesis of immune disorders, and provide us with new foundations to develop novel immuno-or microbe-targeted therapies.",
keywords = "Age effect, Autoimmunity, Innate and adaptive immunity, Microbiota",
author = "Felix, {Krysta M.} and Shekha Tahsin and Wu, {Hsin-Jung Joyce}",
year = "2016",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/nyas.13508",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "1417",
pages = "57--70",
journal = "Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences",
issn = "0077-8923",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Host–Microbiota interplay in mediating immune disorders

AU - Felix, Krysta M.

AU - Tahsin, Shekha

AU - Wu, Hsin-Jung Joyce

PY - 2016/1/1

Y1 - 2016/1/1

N2 - To maintain health, the immune system must maintain a delicate balance between eliminating invading pathogens and avoiding immune disorders such as autoimmunity and allergies. The gut microbiota provide essential health benefits to the host, particularly by regulating immune homeostasis. Dysbiosis, an alteration and imbalance of the gut microbiota, is associated with the development of several autoimmune diseases in both mice and humans. In this review, we discuss recent advances in understanding how certain factors, such as age and gender, affect the gut microbiota, which in turn can influence the development of autoimmune diseases. The age factor in microbiota-dependent immune disorders indicates a window of opportunity for future diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. We also discuss unique commensal bacteria with strong immunomodulatory activity. Finally, we provide an overview of the potential molecular mechanisms whereby gut microbiota induce autoimmunity, as well as the evidence that gut microbiota trigger extraintestinal diseases by inducing the migration of gut-derived immune cells. Elucidating the interaction of gut microbiota and the host immune system will help us understand the pathogenesis of immune disorders, and provide us with new foundations to develop novel immuno-or microbe-targeted therapies.

AB - To maintain health, the immune system must maintain a delicate balance between eliminating invading pathogens and avoiding immune disorders such as autoimmunity and allergies. The gut microbiota provide essential health benefits to the host, particularly by regulating immune homeostasis. Dysbiosis, an alteration and imbalance of the gut microbiota, is associated with the development of several autoimmune diseases in both mice and humans. In this review, we discuss recent advances in understanding how certain factors, such as age and gender, affect the gut microbiota, which in turn can influence the development of autoimmune diseases. The age factor in microbiota-dependent immune disorders indicates a window of opportunity for future diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. We also discuss unique commensal bacteria with strong immunomodulatory activity. Finally, we provide an overview of the potential molecular mechanisms whereby gut microbiota induce autoimmunity, as well as the evidence that gut microbiota trigger extraintestinal diseases by inducing the migration of gut-derived immune cells. Elucidating the interaction of gut microbiota and the host immune system will help us understand the pathogenesis of immune disorders, and provide us with new foundations to develop novel immuno-or microbe-targeted therapies.

KW - Age effect

KW - Autoimmunity

KW - Innate and adaptive immunity

KW - Microbiota

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85043454889&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85043454889&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/nyas.13508

DO - 10.1111/nyas.13508

M3 - Review article

C2 - 28984367

AN - SCOPUS:85043454889

VL - 1417

SP - 57

EP - 70

JO - Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences

JF - Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences

SN - 0077-8923

IS - 1

ER -