Hot spots and core-to-core thermal coupling in future multi-core architectures

M. Janicki, J. H. Collet, Ahmed Louri, A. Napieralski

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper studies hot spot and thermal coupling problems in future multicore architectures as CMOS technology scales from 65 nm feature size to 15 nm. We demonstrate that the thermal coupling between neighboring cores will dramatically increase as the technology scales to smaller feature sizes. The simulation studies were based on solving the heat equation using the analytical Green's function method. Our simulations indicate that the thermal coupling in the 15 nm feature size just after 100 ms of operation will increase from 20 % to 42 % and in the steady state might reach even 65 %. This finding uncovers a major challenge for the design of future multi-core architectures as the technology keeps scaling down. This will require a holistic approach to the design of future multi-core architectures encompassing low power computing, thermal management technologies and workload distribution.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAnnual IEEE Semiconductor Thermal Measurement and Management Symposium
Pages205-209
Number of pages5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010
Event26th Annual IEEE Semiconductor Thermal Measurement and Management Symposium, SEMI-THERM 2010 - Santa Clara, CA, United States
Duration: Feb 21 2010Feb 25 2010

Other

Other26th Annual IEEE Semiconductor Thermal Measurement and Management Symposium, SEMI-THERM 2010
CountryUnited States
CitySanta Clara, CA
Period2/21/102/25/10

Fingerprint

CMOS
Green's functions
simulation
Green's function
Temperature control
scaling
thermodynamics
Hot Temperature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Instrumentation

Cite this

Janicki, M., Collet, J. H., Louri, A., & Napieralski, A. (2010). Hot spots and core-to-core thermal coupling in future multi-core architectures. In Annual IEEE Semiconductor Thermal Measurement and Management Symposium (pp. 205-209). [5444291] https://doi.org/10.1109/STHERM.2010.5444291

Hot spots and core-to-core thermal coupling in future multi-core architectures. / Janicki, M.; Collet, J. H.; Louri, Ahmed; Napieralski, A.

Annual IEEE Semiconductor Thermal Measurement and Management Symposium. 2010. p. 205-209 5444291.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Janicki, M, Collet, JH, Louri, A & Napieralski, A 2010, Hot spots and core-to-core thermal coupling in future multi-core architectures. in Annual IEEE Semiconductor Thermal Measurement and Management Symposium., 5444291, pp. 205-209, 26th Annual IEEE Semiconductor Thermal Measurement and Management Symposium, SEMI-THERM 2010, Santa Clara, CA, United States, 2/21/10. https://doi.org/10.1109/STHERM.2010.5444291
Janicki M, Collet JH, Louri A, Napieralski A. Hot spots and core-to-core thermal coupling in future multi-core architectures. In Annual IEEE Semiconductor Thermal Measurement and Management Symposium. 2010. p. 205-209. 5444291 https://doi.org/10.1109/STHERM.2010.5444291
Janicki, M. ; Collet, J. H. ; Louri, Ahmed ; Napieralski, A. / Hot spots and core-to-core thermal coupling in future multi-core architectures. Annual IEEE Semiconductor Thermal Measurement and Management Symposium. 2010. pp. 205-209
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