How a bird is an island.

Richard Lapoint, Noah K Whiteman

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

Abstract

Replicate adaptive radiations occur when lineages repeatedly radiate and fill new but similar niches and converge phenotypically. While this is commonly seen in traditional island systems, it may also be present in host-parasite relationships, where hosts serve as islands. In a recent article in BMC Biology, Johnson and colleagues have produced the most extensive phylogeny of the avian lice (Ischnocera) to date, and find evidence for this pattern. This study opens the door to exploring adaptive radiations from a novel host-parasite perspective.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)53
Number of pages1
JournalBMC Biology
Volume10
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

adaptive radiation
Birds
Islands
Ischnocera
Radiation
bird
Phthiraptera
Host-Parasite Interactions
lice
birds
host-parasite relationships
parasite
Phylogeny
Parasites
louse
niches
parasites
Biological Sciences
niche
phylogeny

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Structural Biology
  • Physiology
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Plant Science
  • Developmental Biology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

How a bird is an island. / Lapoint, Richard; Whiteman, Noah K.

In: BMC Biology, Vol. 10, 2012, p. 53.

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

Lapoint, Richard ; Whiteman, Noah K. / How a bird is an island. In: BMC Biology. 2012 ; Vol. 10. pp. 53.
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