How can humanistic coaching affect employee well-being and performance? An application of self-determination theory

Allison S. Gabriel, Christina M. Moran, Jane Brodie Gregory

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Coaching has established itself as a key component of employee learning and development. Yet, despite the prevalence and impact of coaching in organisations, there has been a lack of theory regarding the processes through which coaching behaviours influence outcomes for coachees (i.e. motivation, performance and well-being). As such, in the current review, we integrate theory from the emerging humanistic coaching literature with self-determination theory to explicate a process model of how different types of coaching practices (autonomy-, competency- and relatedness-supportive behaviours) that are integral to humanistic coaching influence employee outcomes through the attainment of psychological needs (autonomy, competence and relatedness). The proposed model has practical implications to enhance the success of coaching relationships, in addition to creating a stronger theoretical foundation upon which humanistic coaching research and practice can draw.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)56-73
Number of pages18
JournalCoaching
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • coaching
  • humanistic coaching
  • motivation
  • psychological need satisfaction
  • self-determination theory
  • well-being

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management

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