How Do Verbs Get Their Names? Denominal verbs, Manner Incorporation, and the Ontology of Verb Roots in English

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

This chapter presents evidence showing that denominal verbs in English, of both the location/locatum and the unergative variety, are 'measuredout' by the incorporated nominal Root. This strongly supports the l-syntactic approach of Hale and Keyser (1993), since it shows parallel semantic effects of identical structures in overt syntax and l-syntax, and suggests that English Roots of denominal verbs have inherent semantic properties - in particular, 'boundedness' - which determine the effects they produce when they are Incremental Themes. The analysis presented is not obviously compatible with a functional-projection approach to Aktionsart like those of van Hout (2000), Borer (1996), or Ramchand (2001).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationThe Syntax of Aspect
Subtitle of host publicationDeriving Thematic and Aspectual Interpretation
PublisherOxford University Press
ISBN (Electronic)9780191712845
ISBN (Print)9780199280445
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010

Keywords

  • Denominal verbs
  • Incremental theme
  • Location/locatum
  • Nominal root
  • Root
  • Unergative

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities(all)

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