How reliable are water distribution networks?

Debbie S. Shinstine, Iftekhar Ahmed, Kevin E Lansey

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Reliability analyses are performed on two large-scale water distribution systems in the Tucson Metropolitan Area in Arizona. Reliability is defined as the probability of satisfying nodal demands and pressure heads for various possible pipe failures (breaks) in the water distribution system. An existing reliability model based on a minimum cut-set method is linked to a steady-state simulation model that implicitly solves the continuity and energy equations. The results from the simulation model are used in the reliability model to define minimum cut sets and determine the values of system and nodal reliability. A discrete failure relationship is used with absolute failure if pressure heads fall below a prescribed minimum. Comparisons of results illustrate the similarities and differences in the design of each system under varying operating conditions. Design alternatives to improve reliability are discussed. Copyright ASCE 2004.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationJoint Conference on Water Resource Engineering and Water Resources Planning and Management 2000: Building Partnerships
Volume104
DOIs
StatePublished - 2004
EventJoint Conference on Water Resource Engineering and Water Resources Planning and Management 2000 - Minneapolis, MN, United States
Duration: Jul 30 2000Aug 2 2000

Other

OtherJoint Conference on Water Resource Engineering and Water Resources Planning and Management 2000
CountryUnited States
CityMinneapolis, MN
Period7/30/008/2/00

Fingerprint

Electric power distribution
water
Water
Water distribution systems
distribution system
simulation model
metropolitan area
simulation
pipe
distribution
agglomeration area
continuity
Pipe
energy
water distribution system
Values

Keywords

  • Design
  • Failures
  • Pipes
  • Reliability analysis
  • Simulation models
  • Water distribution

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Geography, Planning and Development

Cite this

Shinstine, D. S., Ahmed, I., & Lansey, K. E. (2004). How reliable are water distribution networks? In Joint Conference on Water Resource Engineering and Water Resources Planning and Management 2000: Building Partnerships (Vol. 104) https://doi.org/10.1061/40517(2000)195

How reliable are water distribution networks? / Shinstine, Debbie S.; Ahmed, Iftekhar; Lansey, Kevin E.

Joint Conference on Water Resource Engineering and Water Resources Planning and Management 2000: Building Partnerships. Vol. 104 2004.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Shinstine, DS, Ahmed, I & Lansey, KE 2004, How reliable are water distribution networks? in Joint Conference on Water Resource Engineering and Water Resources Planning and Management 2000: Building Partnerships. vol. 104, Joint Conference on Water Resource Engineering and Water Resources Planning and Management 2000, Minneapolis, MN, United States, 7/30/00. https://doi.org/10.1061/40517(2000)195
Shinstine DS, Ahmed I, Lansey KE. How reliable are water distribution networks? In Joint Conference on Water Resource Engineering and Water Resources Planning and Management 2000: Building Partnerships. Vol. 104. 2004 https://doi.org/10.1061/40517(2000)195
Shinstine, Debbie S. ; Ahmed, Iftekhar ; Lansey, Kevin E. / How reliable are water distribution networks?. Joint Conference on Water Resource Engineering and Water Resources Planning and Management 2000: Building Partnerships. Vol. 104 2004.
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