How safe is a school? An exploratory study comparing measures and perceptions of safety

Diley Hernandez, Lysbeth Floden, Laura K Bosworth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This exploratory study investigates the relation between incident reports to local law enforcement, and students' and teachers' perceptions of school safety. Using a combination of grounded theory and statistics, we compared quantitative data collected from law enforcement agencies with qualitative data provided by students and teachers during focus groups. Findings show that incidents of serious violence and attacks, minor violence, and other school-related crime, in that order, constituted the most frequently reported incidents. Infrequently reported events included intimidation and bullying, and weapon and alcohol possession. In some cases, even though both students and teachers had similar perceptions of safety, their perceptions did not necessarily match the frequency of official incident reports.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)357-374
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of School Violence
Volume9
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010

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incident
Law enforcement
Students
law enforcement
school
teacher
Crime
violence
local law
student
Alcohols
possession
grounded theory
Statistics
weapon
exclusion
alcohol
statistics
offense
event

Keywords

  • Law enforcement reports
  • Perceptions
  • School safety
  • Students

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality

Cite this

How safe is a school? An exploratory study comparing measures and perceptions of safety. / Hernandez, Diley; Floden, Lysbeth; Bosworth, Laura K.

In: Journal of School Violence, Vol. 9, No. 4, 2010, p. 357-374.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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