How to engage users through gamification: The prevalent effects of playing and mastering over competing

Fernando C. Tomaselli, Otavio P. Sanchez, Susan A Brown

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Over recent years, gamification has been a frequent strategy to increase user engagement. Gamification of systems is usually associated with incorporating mechanisms for attributing points and badges to guide users' behaviors. However, since the dawn of the digital game industry in the 1980's, Malone's work has shown that the desire to play and master a game are important motivations to engage users. This paper aims to analyze the most engaging factors for gamers in the current context of technology. Using a sample of 717 users whose game preferences were classified into eight categories, representing different emphasis on playing, mastering, and competing, results show that competing is the least important factor to motivate engagement. As a consequence, we question the relevance of some of the most used gamification strategies like attributing points, badges, and reputation to participants. Additionally, we offer some suggestions for development of gamification of systems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2015 International Conference on Information Systems: Exploring the Information Frontier, ICIS 2015
PublisherAssociation for Information Systems
StatePublished - 2015
Event2015 International Conference on Information Systems: Exploring the Information Frontier, ICIS 2015 - Fort Worth, United States
Duration: Dec 13 2015Dec 16 2015

Other

Other2015 International Conference on Information Systems: Exploring the Information Frontier, ICIS 2015
CountryUnited States
CityFort Worth
Period12/13/1512/16/15

Fingerprint

Game
Industry
User Behavior
reputation
industry
Engagement
Strategy
Factors
Relevance
Context
Reputation
User behavior

Keywords

  • Adoption
  • Engagement
  • Gamification

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science Applications
  • Statistics, Probability and Uncertainty
  • Library and Information Sciences
  • Applied Mathematics

Cite this

Tomaselli, F. C., Sanchez, O. P., & Brown, S. A. (2015). How to engage users through gamification: The prevalent effects of playing and mastering over competing. In 2015 International Conference on Information Systems: Exploring the Information Frontier, ICIS 2015 Association for Information Systems.

How to engage users through gamification : The prevalent effects of playing and mastering over competing. / Tomaselli, Fernando C.; Sanchez, Otavio P.; Brown, Susan A.

2015 International Conference on Information Systems: Exploring the Information Frontier, ICIS 2015. Association for Information Systems, 2015.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Tomaselli, FC, Sanchez, OP & Brown, SA 2015, How to engage users through gamification: The prevalent effects of playing and mastering over competing. in 2015 International Conference on Information Systems: Exploring the Information Frontier, ICIS 2015. Association for Information Systems, 2015 International Conference on Information Systems: Exploring the Information Frontier, ICIS 2015, Fort Worth, United States, 12/13/15.
Tomaselli FC, Sanchez OP, Brown SA. How to engage users through gamification: The prevalent effects of playing and mastering over competing. In 2015 International Conference on Information Systems: Exploring the Information Frontier, ICIS 2015. Association for Information Systems. 2015
Tomaselli, Fernando C. ; Sanchez, Otavio P. ; Brown, Susan A. / How to engage users through gamification : The prevalent effects of playing and mastering over competing. 2015 International Conference on Information Systems: Exploring the Information Frontier, ICIS 2015. Association for Information Systems, 2015.
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