HST far-ultraviolet imaging of Jupiter during the impacts of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9

John T. Clarke, Renée Prangé, Gilda E. Ballester, John Trauger, Robin Evans, Daniel Rego, Karl Stapelfeldt, Wing Ip, Jean Claude Gérard, Heidi Hammel, Manish Ballav, Lotfi Ben Jaffel, Jean Loup Bertaux, David Crisp, Claude Emerich, Walter M Harris, Mihaly Horanyi, Steven Miller, Alex Storrs, Harold Weaver

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

60 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hubble Space Telescope far-ultraviolet images of Jupiter during the Shoemaker-Levy 9 impacts show the impact regions darkening over the 2 to 3 hours after the impact, becoming darker and more extended than at longer wavelengths, which indicates that ultraviolet-absorbing gases or aerosols are more extended, more absorbing, and at higher altitudes than the absorbers of visible light. Transient auroral emissions were observed near the magnetic conjugate point of the K impact site just after that impact. The global auroral activity was fainter than average during the impacts, and a variable auroral emission feature was observed inside the southern auroral oval preceding the impacts of fragments Q1 and Q2.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1302-1307
Number of pages6
JournalScience
Volume267
Issue number5202
StatePublished - Mar 3 1995
Externally publishedYes

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Telescopes
Aerosols
Gases
Light

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Clarke, J. T., Prangé, R., Ballester, G. E., Trauger, J., Evans, R., Rego, D., ... Weaver, H. (1995). HST far-ultraviolet imaging of Jupiter during the impacts of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9. Science, 267(5202), 1302-1307.

HST far-ultraviolet imaging of Jupiter during the impacts of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9. / Clarke, John T.; Prangé, Renée; Ballester, Gilda E.; Trauger, John; Evans, Robin; Rego, Daniel; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Ip, Wing; Gérard, Jean Claude; Hammel, Heidi; Ballav, Manish; Jaffel, Lotfi Ben; Bertaux, Jean Loup; Crisp, David; Emerich, Claude; Harris, Walter M; Horanyi, Mihaly; Miller, Steven; Storrs, Alex; Weaver, Harold.

In: Science, Vol. 267, No. 5202, 03.03.1995, p. 1302-1307.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Clarke, JT, Prangé, R, Ballester, GE, Trauger, J, Evans, R, Rego, D, Stapelfeldt, K, Ip, W, Gérard, JC, Hammel, H, Ballav, M, Jaffel, LB, Bertaux, JL, Crisp, D, Emerich, C, Harris, WM, Horanyi, M, Miller, S, Storrs, A & Weaver, H 1995, 'HST far-ultraviolet imaging of Jupiter during the impacts of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9', Science, vol. 267, no. 5202, pp. 1302-1307.
Clarke JT, Prangé R, Ballester GE, Trauger J, Evans R, Rego D et al. HST far-ultraviolet imaging of Jupiter during the impacts of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9. Science. 1995 Mar 3;267(5202):1302-1307.
Clarke, John T. ; Prangé, Renée ; Ballester, Gilda E. ; Trauger, John ; Evans, Robin ; Rego, Daniel ; Stapelfeldt, Karl ; Ip, Wing ; Gérard, Jean Claude ; Hammel, Heidi ; Ballav, Manish ; Jaffel, Lotfi Ben ; Bertaux, Jean Loup ; Crisp, David ; Emerich, Claude ; Harris, Walter M ; Horanyi, Mihaly ; Miller, Steven ; Storrs, Alex ; Weaver, Harold. / HST far-ultraviolet imaging of Jupiter during the impacts of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9. In: Science. 1995 ; Vol. 267, No. 5202. pp. 1302-1307.
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abstract = "Hubble Space Telescope far-ultraviolet images of Jupiter during the Shoemaker-Levy 9 impacts show the impact regions darkening over the 2 to 3 hours after the impact, becoming darker and more extended than at longer wavelengths, which indicates that ultraviolet-absorbing gases or aerosols are more extended, more absorbing, and at higher altitudes than the absorbers of visible light. Transient auroral emissions were observed near the magnetic conjugate point of the K impact site just after that impact. The global auroral activity was fainter than average during the impacts, and a variable auroral emission feature was observed inside the southern auroral oval preceding the impacts of fragments Q1 and Q2.",
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AB - Hubble Space Telescope far-ultraviolet images of Jupiter during the Shoemaker-Levy 9 impacts show the impact regions darkening over the 2 to 3 hours after the impact, becoming darker and more extended than at longer wavelengths, which indicates that ultraviolet-absorbing gases or aerosols are more extended, more absorbing, and at higher altitudes than the absorbers of visible light. Transient auroral emissions were observed near the magnetic conjugate point of the K impact site just after that impact. The global auroral activity was fainter than average during the impacts, and a variable auroral emission feature was observed inside the southern auroral oval preceding the impacts of fragments Q1 and Q2.

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