Human-Computer Interaction Movement Indicators of Response Biases in Online Surveys

Jeffrey L. Jenkins, Joseph S. Valacich, Parker A. Williams

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

The Information Systems discipline, as well as countless others, rely on surveys to explore hypotheses and answer research questions. All research methods have strengths and weaknesses. A significant threat to the validity of surveys are response biases – i.e., the tendency of people to respond to questions on some basis other than the question content. We propose that by monitoring how a respondent answers an online survey—through monitoring Human-Computer Interaction movement indicators, specifically mouse-cursor movements—can provide novel information that can be used to statistically detect, understand, and control for many different types of response biases. We explore this proposition in an experiment that examined the relationship between intentions and one’s actual behavior overtime. By moderating the relationship between intentions and behavior using respondents’ mouse-cursor movements, we approximately doubled the r-squared of our conceptual model. The results suggest that some response biases influence mouse-cursor movements when completing an online survey.

Original languageEnglish (US)
StatePublished - 2018
Event38th International Conference on Information Systems: Transforming Society with Digital Innovation, ICIS 2017 - Seoul, Korea, Republic of
Duration: Dec 10 2017Dec 13 2017

Other

Other38th International Conference on Information Systems: Transforming Society with Digital Innovation, ICIS 2017
CountryKorea, Republic of
CitySeoul
Period12/10/1712/13/17

Keywords

  • Data quality
  • Mouse-cursor movements
  • Response bias
  • Response deviation
  • Response time
  • Social desirability bias
  • Survey research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science Applications
  • Information Systems

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