Human dermal fibroblasts derived from oculodentodigital dysplasia patients suggest that patients may have wound-healing defects

Jared M. Churko, Qing Shao, Xiang qun Gong, Kathryn J. Swoboda, Donglin Bai, Jacinda Sampson, Dale W. Laird

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Scopus citations

Abstract

Oculodentodigital dysplasia (ODDD) is primarily an autosomal dominant human disease caused by any one of over 60 mutations in the GJA1 gene encoding the gap junction protein Cx43. In the present study, wound healing was investigated in a G60S ODDD mutant mouse model and by using dermal fibroblasts isolated from two ODDD patients harboring the p.D3N and p.V216L mutants along with dermal fibroblasts isolated from their respective unaffected relatives. Punch biopsies revealed a delay in wound closure in the G60S mutant mice in comparison to wild-type littermates, and this delay appeared to be due to defects in the dermal fibroblasts. Although both the p.D3N and p.V216L mutants reduced gap junctional intercellular communication in human dermal fibroblasts, immunolocalization studies revealed that Cx43 gap junctions were prevalent at the cell surface of p.D3N expressing fibroblasts but greatly reduced in p.V216L expressing fibroblasts. Mutant expressing fibroblasts were further found to have reduced proliferation and migration capabilities. Finally, in response to TGFβ1, mutant expressing fibroblasts expressed significantly less alpha smooth muscle actin suggesting they were inefficient in their ability to differentiate into myofibroblasts. Collectively, our results suggest that ODDD patients may have subclinical defects in wound healing due to impaired function of dermal fibroblasts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)456-466
Number of pages11
JournalHuman Mutation
Volume32
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Cx43
  • Fibroblasts
  • GJA1
  • Gap junctions
  • ODDD
  • Oculodentodigital dysplasia
  • Phosphorylation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Genetics(clinical)

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