Human laminin-5 and laminin-10 mediated gene expression of prostate carcinoma cells

Robert Calaluce, Shaleen K. Beck, Elisabeth L. Bair, Ritu Pandey, Kevin A. Greer, Adam M. Hoying, James B. Hoying, David W. Mount, Raymond B Nagle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In prostate cancer progression, the basal lamina switches from predominantly laminin-5 to laminin-10. DU-145 prostate cancer cells were treated with either soluble laminin-5 (20 ng/ml) or laminin-10 (1 μg/ml) for 6, 24, and 48 hr. Total RNA was harvested for a 7,500 human cDNA microarray. Hybridizations were carried out in accordance with a 10 sample analysis of variance (ANOVA) statistical model. One thousand one hundred sixteen genes had measurable expression 2 standard deviations above background and 50% of spots for any given sample for all hybridizations were positive. Expression values of significantly varying genes were clustered and a list of 408 genes (P < 0.05) with a 1.5 or greater fold change in at least one time point were chosen for further analysis. Seventy eight changed in a time-dependent manner with laminin-10 treatment, 85 changed with laminin-5, and 13 showed changes with both treatments. The 408 genes that passed a paired t-test in at least one time-dependent category were further analyzed using Pathway Miner. One of the largest gene association networks involved signal transduction in the growth factor-MAP kinase pathways. EGFR was validated by real-time PCR and laminin-10 mediated cell adhesion activated EGFR in DU-145 cells. Both laminins appear to be important signal transducers in prostate cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1381-1390
Number of pages10
JournalProstate
Volume66
Issue number13
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 13 2006

Fingerprint

Prostate
Carcinoma
Gene Expression
Prostatic Neoplasms
Genes
Gene Regulatory Networks
Statistical Models
Laminin
Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis
Transducers
Basement Membrane
Cell Adhesion
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
Signal Transduction
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins
Analysis of Variance
Phosphotransferases
RNA
laminin 10
kalinin

Keywords

  • cDNA microarray
  • Laminin-10
  • Laminin-5
  • Prostate carcinoma cells
  • Signal transduction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

Calaluce, R., Beck, S. K., Bair, E. L., Pandey, R., Greer, K. A., Hoying, A. M., ... Nagle, R. B. (2006). Human laminin-5 and laminin-10 mediated gene expression of prostate carcinoma cells. Prostate, 66(13), 1381-1390. https://doi.org/10.1002/pros.20393

Human laminin-5 and laminin-10 mediated gene expression of prostate carcinoma cells. / Calaluce, Robert; Beck, Shaleen K.; Bair, Elisabeth L.; Pandey, Ritu; Greer, Kevin A.; Hoying, Adam M.; Hoying, James B.; Mount, David W.; Nagle, Raymond B.

In: Prostate, Vol. 66, No. 13, 13.09.2006, p. 1381-1390.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Calaluce, R, Beck, SK, Bair, EL, Pandey, R, Greer, KA, Hoying, AM, Hoying, JB, Mount, DW & Nagle, RB 2006, 'Human laminin-5 and laminin-10 mediated gene expression of prostate carcinoma cells', Prostate, vol. 66, no. 13, pp. 1381-1390. https://doi.org/10.1002/pros.20393
Calaluce R, Beck SK, Bair EL, Pandey R, Greer KA, Hoying AM et al. Human laminin-5 and laminin-10 mediated gene expression of prostate carcinoma cells. Prostate. 2006 Sep 13;66(13):1381-1390. https://doi.org/10.1002/pros.20393
Calaluce, Robert ; Beck, Shaleen K. ; Bair, Elisabeth L. ; Pandey, Ritu ; Greer, Kevin A. ; Hoying, Adam M. ; Hoying, James B. ; Mount, David W. ; Nagle, Raymond B. / Human laminin-5 and laminin-10 mediated gene expression of prostate carcinoma cells. In: Prostate. 2006 ; Vol. 66, No. 13. pp. 1381-1390.
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