Human Rights for the Digital Age

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Human rights are those legal and/or moral rights that all persons have simply as persons. In the current digital age, human rights are increasingly being either fulfilled or violated in the online environment. In this article, I provide a way of conceptualizing the relationships between human rights and information technology. I do so by pointing out a number of misunderstandings of human rights evident in Vinton Cerf's recent argument that there is no human right to the Internet. I claim that Cerf fails to recognize the existence of derived human rights. I argue further that we need to consider what other human rights are necessitated by the digital age. I suggest we need a Declaration of Digital Rights. As a step toward the development of such a declaration, I suggest a framework for thinking through how to ensure the human rights are satisfied in digital contexts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2-18
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Mass Media Ethics: Exploring Questions of Media Morality
Volume29
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2014

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Information technology
human rights
Internet
human being
Human Rights
Digital Age
information technology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication
  • Philosophy

Cite this

Human Rights for the Digital Age. / Mathiesen, Kristy K.

In: Journal of Mass Media Ethics: Exploring Questions of Media Morality, Vol. 29, No. 1, 01.2014, p. 2-18.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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