Humanizing chemistry education: From simple contextualization to multifaceted problematization

Jesper Sjöström, Vicente A Talanquer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Chemistry teaching has traditionally been weakly connected to everyday life, technology, society, and history and philosophy of science. This article highlights knowledge areas and perspectives needed by the humanistic (and critical-reflexive) chemistry teacher. Different humanistic approaches in chemistry teaching, from simple contextualization to socioscientific orientations to multifaceted problematization, are discussed. The latter is crucial for "critical chemistry teaching", which includes both problematized content knowledge in chemistry and problematized knowledge about chemistry and chemistry education (about the nature of chemistry, its role in society, and the way it is communicated inside and outside the classroom). We illustrate how various facets of chemistry knowledge for teaching can be used to characterize different levels of complexity in the integration of the human element into chemistry education.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1125-1131
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Chemical Education
Volume91
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 12 2014

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chemistry
Education
education
Teaching
chemistry teacher
history of science
philosophy of science
everyday life
classroom

Keywords

  • Applications of Chemistry
  • Curriculum
  • General Public
  • Green Chemistry
  • History/Philosophy
  • Problem Solving/Decision Making

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Education

Cite this

Humanizing chemistry education : From simple contextualization to multifaceted problematization. / Sjöström, Jesper; Talanquer, Vicente A.

In: Journal of Chemical Education, Vol. 91, No. 8, 12.08.2014, p. 1125-1131.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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