HUNTING for PLANETS in the HL TAU DISK

L. Testi, A. Skemer, Th Henning, V. Bailey, D. Defrére, Philip M Hinz, J. Leisenring, A. Vaz, S. Esposito, A. Fontana, A. Marconi, M. Skrutskie, C. Veillet

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent ALMA images of HL Tau show gaps in the dusty disk that may be caused by planetary bodies. Given the young age of this system, if confirmed, this finding would imply very short timescales for planet formation, probably in a gravitationally unstable disk. To test this scenario, we searched for young planets by means of direct imaging in the L′ band using the Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer mid-infrared camera. At the location of two prominent dips in the dust distribution at ∼70 AU (∼0.″5) from the central star, we reach a contrast level of ∼7.5 mag. We did not detect any point sources at the location of the rings. Using evolutionary models we derive upper limits of ∼10-15 MJup at ≤0.5-1 Ma for the possible planets. With these sensitivity limits we should have been able to detect companions sufficiently massive to open full gaps in the disk. The structures detected at millimeter wavelengths could be gaps in the distributions of large grains on the disk midplane caused by planets not massive enough to fully open the gaps. Future ALMA observations of the molecular gas density profile and kinematics as well as higher contrast infrared observations may be able to provide a definitive answer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberL38
JournalAstrophysical Journal Letters
Volume812
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 20 2015

Fingerprint

planets
planet
gas density
ultrahigh frequencies
molecular gases
interferometer
point sources
point source
dip
kinematics
interferometers
dust
cameras
telescopes
wavelength
timescale
stars
sensitivity
rings
profiles

Keywords

  • disk interactions
  • planet
  • protoplanetary disks
  • stars: individual (HL Tau)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
  • Space and Planetary Science

Cite this

Testi, L., Skemer, A., Henning, T., Bailey, V., Defrére, D., Hinz, P. M., ... Veillet, C. (2015). HUNTING for PLANETS in the HL TAU DISK. Astrophysical Journal Letters, 812(2), [L38]. https://doi.org/10.1088/2041-8205/812/2/L38

HUNTING for PLANETS in the HL TAU DISK. / Testi, L.; Skemer, A.; Henning, Th; Bailey, V.; Defrére, D.; Hinz, Philip M; Leisenring, J.; Vaz, A.; Esposito, S.; Fontana, A.; Marconi, A.; Skrutskie, M.; Veillet, C.

In: Astrophysical Journal Letters, Vol. 812, No. 2, L38, 20.10.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Testi, L, Skemer, A, Henning, T, Bailey, V, Defrére, D, Hinz, PM, Leisenring, J, Vaz, A, Esposito, S, Fontana, A, Marconi, A, Skrutskie, M & Veillet, C 2015, 'HUNTING for PLANETS in the HL TAU DISK', Astrophysical Journal Letters, vol. 812, no. 2, L38. https://doi.org/10.1088/2041-8205/812/2/L38
Testi L, Skemer A, Henning T, Bailey V, Defrére D, Hinz PM et al. HUNTING for PLANETS in the HL TAU DISK. Astrophysical Journal Letters. 2015 Oct 20;812(2). L38. https://doi.org/10.1088/2041-8205/812/2/L38
Testi, L. ; Skemer, A. ; Henning, Th ; Bailey, V. ; Defrére, D. ; Hinz, Philip M ; Leisenring, J. ; Vaz, A. ; Esposito, S. ; Fontana, A. ; Marconi, A. ; Skrutskie, M. ; Veillet, C. / HUNTING for PLANETS in the HL TAU DISK. In: Astrophysical Journal Letters. 2015 ; Vol. 812, No. 2.
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