Hurricane Andrew and a Florida fig pollination mutualism: resilience of an obligate interaction

Judith L Bronstein, M. Hossaert-Mckey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Reports on the recovery of a Florida fig pollination mutualism devastated by Hurricane Andrew in August 1992. Damage to Ficus aurea included loss of all leaves and fruits and many branches, as well as the presumed local extinction of its pollinator Pegoscapus jimenezi. Within five months, however, fig flowering phenology and fig wasp abundance had recovered to near prehurricane levels. Unusual phenological traits of F. aurea may have aided in the rapid reestablishment of pollinator populations; also, the wasps may have previously underappreciated capacities for long distance movements. This study suggests that obligate interactions can be resilient to certain population-level catastrophes. -from Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)373-381
Number of pages9
JournalBiotropica
Volume27
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1995

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mutualism
hurricanes
figs
wasp
pollinator
pollination
pollinators
hurricane
Pegoscapus
Agaonidae
Ficus
local extinction
phenology
flowering
extinction
fruit
damage
fruits
leaves
loss

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology

Cite this

Hurricane Andrew and a Florida fig pollination mutualism : resilience of an obligate interaction. / Bronstein, Judith L; Hossaert-Mckey, M.

In: Biotropica, Vol. 27, No. 3, 1995, p. 373-381.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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