Hyperchaotic probe for damage identification using nonlinear prediction error

Shahab Torkamani, Eric Butcher, Michael D. Todd, Gyuhae Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The idea of damage assessment based on using a steady-state chaotic excitation and state space embedding, proposed during the recent few years, has led to the development of a computationally feasible health monitoring technique based on comparisons between the geometry of a baseline attractor and a test attractor at some unknown state of health. This study explores an extension to this concept, namely a hyperchaotic excitation. Three different types of Lorenz chaotic/hyperchaotic oscillators are used to provide the excitations and comparisons are made using a prediction error feature called 'nonlinear auto-prediction error', which is based on attractor geometry, to evaluate the efficiency of chaotic excitation versus hyperchaotic ones. An 8-degree-of-freedom system and a cantilever beam are two models that are used for numerical simulation. A comparison between the results from the chaotic excitation with the results from each of the hyperchaotic excitations, obtained for both of the numerical models, highlights the higher sensitivity of a hyperchaotic excitation relative to a chaotic excitation. The experimental results also confirm the numerical results conveying the higher sensitivity of the hyperchaotic excitation compared to the chaotic one. A hyperchaotic excitation having three positive Lyapunov exponents is shown in some cases to be even more sensitive than a two-positive-Lyapunov-exponent hyperchaotic excitation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)457-473
Number of pages17
JournalMechanical Systems and Signal Processing
Volume29
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Health
Geometry
Cantilever beams
Conveying
Numerical models
Monitoring
Computer simulation

Keywords

  • Attractor geometry
  • Damage identification
  • Hyperchaotic excitation
  • Prediction error

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Aerospace Engineering
  • Control and Systems Engineering
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Signal Processing

Cite this

Hyperchaotic probe for damage identification using nonlinear prediction error. / Torkamani, Shahab; Butcher, Eric; Todd, Michael D.; Park, Gyuhae.

In: Mechanical Systems and Signal Processing, Vol. 29, 05.2012, p. 457-473.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Torkamani, Shahab ; Butcher, Eric ; Todd, Michael D. ; Park, Gyuhae. / Hyperchaotic probe for damage identification using nonlinear prediction error. In: Mechanical Systems and Signal Processing. 2012 ; Vol. 29. pp. 457-473.
@article{0013ad0cf36b4234a2fc5fb446f65a05,
title = "Hyperchaotic probe for damage identification using nonlinear prediction error",
abstract = "The idea of damage assessment based on using a steady-state chaotic excitation and state space embedding, proposed during the recent few years, has led to the development of a computationally feasible health monitoring technique based on comparisons between the geometry of a baseline attractor and a test attractor at some unknown state of health. This study explores an extension to this concept, namely a hyperchaotic excitation. Three different types of Lorenz chaotic/hyperchaotic oscillators are used to provide the excitations and comparisons are made using a prediction error feature called 'nonlinear auto-prediction error', which is based on attractor geometry, to evaluate the efficiency of chaotic excitation versus hyperchaotic ones. An 8-degree-of-freedom system and a cantilever beam are two models that are used for numerical simulation. A comparison between the results from the chaotic excitation with the results from each of the hyperchaotic excitations, obtained for both of the numerical models, highlights the higher sensitivity of a hyperchaotic excitation relative to a chaotic excitation. The experimental results also confirm the numerical results conveying the higher sensitivity of the hyperchaotic excitation compared to the chaotic one. A hyperchaotic excitation having three positive Lyapunov exponents is shown in some cases to be even more sensitive than a two-positive-Lyapunov-exponent hyperchaotic excitation.",
keywords = "Attractor geometry, Damage identification, Hyperchaotic excitation, Prediction error",
author = "Shahab Torkamani and Eric Butcher and Todd, {Michael D.} and Gyuhae Park",
year = "2012",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1016/j.ymssp.2011.12.019",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "29",
pages = "457--473",
journal = "Mechanical Systems and Signal Processing",
issn = "0888-3270",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Hyperchaotic probe for damage identification using nonlinear prediction error

AU - Torkamani, Shahab

AU - Butcher, Eric

AU - Todd, Michael D.

AU - Park, Gyuhae

PY - 2012/5

Y1 - 2012/5

N2 - The idea of damage assessment based on using a steady-state chaotic excitation and state space embedding, proposed during the recent few years, has led to the development of a computationally feasible health monitoring technique based on comparisons between the geometry of a baseline attractor and a test attractor at some unknown state of health. This study explores an extension to this concept, namely a hyperchaotic excitation. Three different types of Lorenz chaotic/hyperchaotic oscillators are used to provide the excitations and comparisons are made using a prediction error feature called 'nonlinear auto-prediction error', which is based on attractor geometry, to evaluate the efficiency of chaotic excitation versus hyperchaotic ones. An 8-degree-of-freedom system and a cantilever beam are two models that are used for numerical simulation. A comparison between the results from the chaotic excitation with the results from each of the hyperchaotic excitations, obtained for both of the numerical models, highlights the higher sensitivity of a hyperchaotic excitation relative to a chaotic excitation. The experimental results also confirm the numerical results conveying the higher sensitivity of the hyperchaotic excitation compared to the chaotic one. A hyperchaotic excitation having three positive Lyapunov exponents is shown in some cases to be even more sensitive than a two-positive-Lyapunov-exponent hyperchaotic excitation.

AB - The idea of damage assessment based on using a steady-state chaotic excitation and state space embedding, proposed during the recent few years, has led to the development of a computationally feasible health monitoring technique based on comparisons between the geometry of a baseline attractor and a test attractor at some unknown state of health. This study explores an extension to this concept, namely a hyperchaotic excitation. Three different types of Lorenz chaotic/hyperchaotic oscillators are used to provide the excitations and comparisons are made using a prediction error feature called 'nonlinear auto-prediction error', which is based on attractor geometry, to evaluate the efficiency of chaotic excitation versus hyperchaotic ones. An 8-degree-of-freedom system and a cantilever beam are two models that are used for numerical simulation. A comparison between the results from the chaotic excitation with the results from each of the hyperchaotic excitations, obtained for both of the numerical models, highlights the higher sensitivity of a hyperchaotic excitation relative to a chaotic excitation. The experimental results also confirm the numerical results conveying the higher sensitivity of the hyperchaotic excitation compared to the chaotic one. A hyperchaotic excitation having three positive Lyapunov exponents is shown in some cases to be even more sensitive than a two-positive-Lyapunov-exponent hyperchaotic excitation.

KW - Attractor geometry

KW - Damage identification

KW - Hyperchaotic excitation

KW - Prediction error

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84859424600&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84859424600&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.ymssp.2011.12.019

DO - 10.1016/j.ymssp.2011.12.019

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84859424600

VL - 29

SP - 457

EP - 473

JO - Mechanical Systems and Signal Processing

JF - Mechanical Systems and Signal Processing

SN - 0888-3270

ER -