'HyperShear in a channel': A microfluidic facsimile of ventricular assist devices to reduce thrombotic risk and enhance patient safety

A. Dimasi, A. Redaelli, D. Bluestein, M. Rasponi, Marvin J Slepian

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Thrombosis of ventricular assist devices is a significant complication compromising device efficacy with attendant risks of systemic embolization, stroke, pump stop and death. Presently anti-thrombotic therapy is utilized to mitigate thrombotic risk. Drugs such as aspirin and dipyridamole are largely dosed empirically, without individualized testing of efficacy in a given patient. To date testing systems available for examining anti-platelet agent efficacy are limited in that they are largely central lab-based and typically examine drug efficacy under conditions that do not represent the flow and shear conditions of the patient during actual VAD use. In the present paper we adopt a technology, Device Thrombogenicity Emulation - a methodology developed by our group which characterizes the actual shear stress history experienced by platelets in a blood recirculating device, i.e. total exposure level, individual platelet flight trajectories - and utilize this to create a facsimile of the shear stress profile of a ventricular assist device in a small footprint microfluidic channel point-of-care system. Creating a device-specific microfluidic facsimile will allow the development of a point-of-care testing system reflective of an actual device in a given patient. This will afford determination of anti-thrombotic agent efficacy under personalized conditions, reducing the likelihood of VAD thrombosis, increasing overall patient safety.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2014 IEEE Healthcare Innovation Conference, HIC 2014
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
Pages14-17
Number of pages4
ISBN (Print)9781467363648
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 10 2014
Event2014 IEEE Healthcare Innovation Conference, HIC 2014 - Seattle, United States
Duration: Oct 8 2014Oct 10 2014

Other

Other2014 IEEE Healthcare Innovation Conference, HIC 2014
CountryUnited States
CitySeattle
Period10/8/1410/10/14

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

Dimasi, A., Redaelli, A., Bluestein, D., Rasponi, M., & Slepian, M. J. (2014). 'HyperShear in a channel': A microfluidic facsimile of ventricular assist devices to reduce thrombotic risk and enhance patient safety. In 2014 IEEE Healthcare Innovation Conference, HIC 2014 (pp. 14-17). [7038863] Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1109/HIC.2014.7038863