Hypnosis to manage anxiety and pain associated with colonoscopy for colorectal cancer screening: Case studies and possible benefits

Gary Elkins, Joseph White, Parita Patel, Joel Marcus, Michelle M. Perfect, Guy H. Montgomery

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

32 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study explored using hypnosis for pain and anxiety management in 6 colonoscopy patients (5 men, 1 woman), who received a hypnotic induction and instruction in self-hypnosis on the day of their colonoscopy. Patients' levels of anxiety were obtained before and after the hypnotic induction using Visual Analogue Scales (VAS). Following colonoscopy, VASs were used to assess anxiety and pain during colonoscopy, perceived effectiveness of hypnosis, and patient satisfaction with medical care. Hypnotizability was assessed at a separate appointment. The authors also obtained data (time for procedure, number of vasovagal events, and recovery time) for 10 consecutive patients who received standard care. Results suggest that hypnosis appears to be a feasible method to manage anxiety and pain associated with colonoscopy, reduces the need for sedation, and may have other benefits such as reduced vasovagal events and recovery time.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)416-431
Number of pages16
JournalInternational Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis
Volume54
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2006
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Complementary and Manual Therapy
  • Clinical Psychology

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