Identifying Multilevel Barriers to Tobacco Intervention in Postdoctoral Dental Education

David A. Albert, Emilie Bruzelius, Angela Ward, Judith S Gordon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aims of this mixed-methods study were to assess tobacco treatment behaviors among residents and faculty in dental specialty postdoctoral programs and to explore factors in training and practice related to tobacco treatment education. Surveys and focus groups were conducted with a convenience sample of participants at three postdoctoral residency programs in New York City. Surveys assessed tobacco cessation training and behaviors. Focus groups explored barriers to implementing tobacco cessation treatment in educational settings. Data were collected between May and December 2013. Among the 160 faculty and residents identified as potentially eligible for the study, 60 were invited by program directors to participate, and 50 subsequently completed the survey and participated in a focus group (response rate of 31.3%). Survey results indicated high levels of asking patients about tobacco use and advising patients to quit. In contrast, specific tobacco cessation assistance and follow-up care occurred less frequently. There were statistically significant differences in tobacco cessation intervention across the specialties surveyed, but not between residents and faculty. Focus group comments were grouped into three broad areas: clinician factors, organizational support, and structural and contextual factors. Focus group results indicated that participants experienced significant organizational and structural barriers to learning about and providing tobacco treatment. Participants from each specialty indicated that multi-level barriers impeded their provision of evidence-based tobacco cessation interventions in postdoctoral educational settings. They suggested that didactic education should be reinforced by organizational- and systems-level changes to facilitate comprehensive tobacco education and effective cessation treatment in future dental practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)408-415
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Dental Education
Volume80
Issue number4
StatePublished - Apr 1 2016

Fingerprint

Tobacco Use Cessation
Dental Education
Focus Groups
nicotine
Tobacco
Withholding Treatment
education
Education
Dental Specialties
Aftercare
Tobacco Use
educational setting
resident
Internship and Residency
Group
Tooth
Therapeutics
Learning
Surveys and Questionnaires
didactics

Keywords

  • advanced dental education
  • dental education
  • postdoctoral dental education
  • smoking cessation
  • tobacco
  • tobacco dependence treatment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Identifying Multilevel Barriers to Tobacco Intervention in Postdoctoral Dental Education. / Albert, David A.; Bruzelius, Emilie; Ward, Angela; Gordon, Judith S.

In: Journal of Dental Education, Vol. 80, No. 4, 01.04.2016, p. 408-415.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Albert, David A. ; Bruzelius, Emilie ; Ward, Angela ; Gordon, Judith S. / Identifying Multilevel Barriers to Tobacco Intervention in Postdoctoral Dental Education. In: Journal of Dental Education. 2016 ; Vol. 80, No. 4. pp. 408-415.
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