Illusory Concomitant Motion in Ambiguous Stereograms. Evidence for Nonstimulus Contributions to Perceptual Organization

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Scopus citations

Abstract

Three experiments were performed to test whether perceptual organization is cognitively or motivationally penetrable. In Experiments 1 and 2, subjects viewed a reversible stereogram while instructed to hold one depth organization. Responses about depth were recorded indirectly by recording responses about direction of the illusory concomitant motion that is perceptually coupled to depth in a stereogram. Inasmuch as perceptually coupled variables covary without necessary stimulus covariation, a postperceptual locus for any intention effects they exhibit is unlikely. Experiments 2 and 3 examined the possibility that instructed intention might influence perception indirectly by influencing eye movements: Viewers' vergence position was measured directly through responses about alignment of a vernier nonius fixation. In all three experiments, a residual effect of instructed intention was found. Therefore, instructed intention may influence perceptual organization by influencing internal nonstimulus components integral to the perceptual process.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)50-60
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 1986
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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