Image-quality assessment in optical tomography

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Modern medical imaging systems often rely on complicated hardware and sophisticated algorithms to produce useful digital images. It is essential that the imaging hardware and any reconstruction algorithms used are optimized, enabling radiologists to make the best decisions and quantify a patient's health status. Optimization of the hardware often entails determining the physical design of the system, such as the the locations of detectors in optical tomography or the design of the collimator in SPECT systems. For software or reconstruction algorithm optimization one is often determining the values of regularization parameters or the number of iterations in an iterative algorithm. In this paper, we present an overview of many approaches to measuring task performance as a means to optimize imaging systems and algorithms. Much of the work in this area has taken place in the areas of nuclear-medicine and x-ray imaging. The purpose of this paper is to present some of the task-based measures of image quality that are directly applicable to optical tomography.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2004 2nd IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: Macro to Nano
Pages1471-1474
Number of pages4
Volume2
StatePublished - 2004
Event2004 2nd IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: Macro to Nano - Arlington, VA, United States
Duration: Apr 15 2004Apr 18 2004

Other

Other2004 2nd IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: Macro to Nano
CountryUnited States
CityArlington, VA
Period4/15/044/18/04

Fingerprint

Optical tomography
Image quality
Hardware
Imaging systems
Nuclear medicine
Imaging techniques
Medical imaging
Health
Detectors
X rays

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Kupinski, M. A., & Clarkson, E. W. (2004). Image-quality assessment in optical tomography. In 2004 2nd IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: Macro to Nano (Vol. 2, pp. 1471-1474)

Image-quality assessment in optical tomography. / Kupinski, Matthew A; Clarkson, Eric W.

2004 2nd IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: Macro to Nano. Vol. 2 2004. p. 1471-1474.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Kupinski, MA & Clarkson, EW 2004, Image-quality assessment in optical tomography. in 2004 2nd IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: Macro to Nano. vol. 2, pp. 1471-1474, 2004 2nd IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: Macro to Nano, Arlington, VA, United States, 4/15/04.
Kupinski MA, Clarkson EW. Image-quality assessment in optical tomography. In 2004 2nd IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: Macro to Nano. Vol. 2. 2004. p. 1471-1474
Kupinski, Matthew A ; Clarkson, Eric W. / Image-quality assessment in optical tomography. 2004 2nd IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: Macro to Nano. Vol. 2 2004. pp. 1471-1474
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