IMMIGRATION ENFORCEMENT, the RACIALIZATION of LEGAL STATUS, and PERCEPTIONS of the POLICE

Cecilia Menjívar, William P Simmons, Daniel Alvord, Elizabeth Salerno Valdez

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The immigration enforcement system today affects different subgroups of Latinos; it reaches beyond the undocumented to immigrants who hold legal statuses and even to the U.S.-born. States have enacted their own enforcement collaboration agreements with federal authorities and thus Latinos may have dissimilar experiences based on where they live. This article examines the effects of enforcement schemes on Latinos' likelihood of reporting crimes to police and views of law enforcement. It includes documented and U.S-born Latinos to capture the spillover beyond the undocumented, and it is based on four metropolitan areas-Los Angeles, Houston, Phoenix, and Chicago-to comparatively assess the effects of various enforcement contexts. Empirically, it relies on data from a random sample survey of over 2000 Latinos conducted in 2012 in these four cities. Results show that spillover effects vary by context and legal/citizenship status: Latino immigrants with legal status are less inclined to report to the police as compared to U.S.-born Latinos in Houston, Los Angeles, and Phoenix but not in Chicago. At the other end, the spillover effect in Phoenix is so strong that it almost reaches to U.S.-born Latinos. The spillover effect identified is possible due to the close association between being Latino or Mexican and being undocumented, underscoring the racialization of legal status and of immigration enforcement today.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)107-128
Number of pages22
JournalDu Bois Review
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

legal status
immigration
police
immigrant
federal authority
law enforcement
random sample
agglomeration area
citizenship
offense
experience

Keywords

  • Chicago
  • Citizenship Legal Status
  • Houston
  • Immigration Enforcement
  • Latino Immigrants
  • Los Angeles
  • Phoenix
  • Racialization
  • U.S.-Born Latinos

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cultural Studies
  • Anthropology
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

IMMIGRATION ENFORCEMENT, the RACIALIZATION of LEGAL STATUS, and PERCEPTIONS of the POLICE. / Menjívar, Cecilia; Simmons, William P; Alvord, Daniel; Salerno Valdez, Elizabeth.

In: Du Bois Review, Vol. 15, No. 1, 01.01.2018, p. 107-128.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Menjívar, Cecilia ; Simmons, William P ; Alvord, Daniel ; Salerno Valdez, Elizabeth. / IMMIGRATION ENFORCEMENT, the RACIALIZATION of LEGAL STATUS, and PERCEPTIONS of the POLICE. In: Du Bois Review. 2018 ; Vol. 15, No. 1. pp. 107-128.
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