Impact of a community-based breast cancer screening program on Hopi women

S. R. Brown, T. Nuno, L. Joshweseoma, R. C. Begay, C. Goodluck, Robin B Harris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To examine changes in breast cancer knowledge, attitudes, beliefs and behaviors following implementation of a tribal run CDC Breast and Cervical Cancer Program (BCCP), we report 2006 survey results from Hopi women and contrast findings with 1993 survey data and BCCP reports. Methods: Community meetings, focus groups, and researchers jointly developed a culturally appropriate survey instrument. Hopi women randomly selected from Tribal enrollment lists were interviewed in-person by Hopi interviewers; 250 women ≥ age 18 participated (87% response) between June and December, 2006. Results: Among women 40+, 77.5% reported ever having had a mammogram and 68.9% reported having done so within the past 2. years, an increase from 45.2% and 46% self-reported in 1993. Compared to 1993, more women in 2006 (88.1% vs. 59%) believed that a mammogram can detect cancer and more than 90% now believe that early detection of cancer can save lives. Women reported a preference (60%) for receiving health care at the Hopi BCCP. Survey results were validated using programmatic data which estimated 76.6% of Hopi women had received mammography screening. Conclusion: Implementation of a tribal run BCCP has resulted in a substantial increase in mammography screening on the Hopi reservation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)390-393
Number of pages4
JournalPreventive Medicine
Volume52
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2011

Fingerprint

Early Detection of Cancer
Breast Neoplasms
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Mammography
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Focus Groups
Research Personnel
Interviews
Delivery of Health Care
Surveys and Questionnaires
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • American Indian
  • Breast cancer
  • Cancer screening
  • Mammography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Impact of a community-based breast cancer screening program on Hopi women. / Brown, S. R.; Nuno, T.; Joshweseoma, L.; Begay, R. C.; Goodluck, C.; Harris, Robin B.

In: Preventive Medicine, Vol. 52, No. 5, 01.05.2011, p. 390-393.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brown, SR, Nuno, T, Joshweseoma, L, Begay, RC, Goodluck, C & Harris, RB 2011, 'Impact of a community-based breast cancer screening program on Hopi women', Preventive Medicine, vol. 52, no. 5, pp. 390-393. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2011.02.012
Brown, S. R. ; Nuno, T. ; Joshweseoma, L. ; Begay, R. C. ; Goodluck, C. ; Harris, Robin B. / Impact of a community-based breast cancer screening program on Hopi women. In: Preventive Medicine. 2011 ; Vol. 52, No. 5. pp. 390-393.
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