Impact of a rural solar electrification project on the level and structure of women's empowerment

Jennifer Burney, Halimatou Alaofè, Rosamond Naylor, Douglas L Taren

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although development organizations agree that reliable access to energy and energy services-one of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals-is likely to have profound and perhaps disproportionate impacts on women, few studies have directly empirically estimated the impact of energy access on women's empowerment. This is a result of both a relative dearth of energy access evaluations in general and a lack of clarity on how to quantify gender impacts of development projects. Here we present an evaluation of the impacts of the Solar Market Garden-a distributed photovoltaic irrigation project-on the level and structure of women's empowerment in Benin, West Africa. We use a quasi-experimental design (matched-pair villages) to estimate changes in empowerment for project beneficiaries after one year of Solar Market Garden production relative to non-beneficiaries in both treatment and comparison villages (n = 771). To create an empowerment metric, we constructed a set of general questions based on existing theories of empowerment, and then used latent variable analysis to understand the underlying structure of empowerment locally. We repeated this analysis at follow-up to understand whether the structure of empowerment had changed over time, and then measured changes in both the levels and likelihood of empowerment over time. We show that the Solar Market Garden significantly positively impacted women's empowerment, particularly through the domain of economic independence. In addition to providing rigorous evidence for the impact of a rural renewable energy project on women's empowerment, our work lays out a methodology that can be used in the future to benchmark the gender impacts of energy projects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number095007
JournalEnvironmental Research Letters
Volume12
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 11 2017

Fingerprint

electrification
empowerment
garden
energy
market
gender
village
project
woman
Power (Psychology)
Renewable Energy
Benin
Benchmarking
Western Africa
Conservation of Natural Resources
Irrigation
development project
experimental design
Design of experiments
Sustainable development

Keywords

  • Benin
  • Drip irrigation
  • Energy access
  • Photovoltaic
  • Solar Market Garden
  • Sustainable Development Goals
  • Women′s empowerment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Impact of a rural solar electrification project on the level and structure of women's empowerment. / Burney, Jennifer; Alaofè, Halimatou; Naylor, Rosamond; Taren, Douglas L.

In: Environmental Research Letters, Vol. 12, No. 9, 095007, 11.09.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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