Impact of changes in home smoking bans on tobacco cessation among quitline callers

Nicole P Yuan, Uma S. Nair, Tracy E. Crane, Laurie Krupski, Bradley N. Collins, Melanie L Bell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Home smoking bans may be an effective way to promote tobacco cessation among treatment seeking smokers. Few studies have examined this relationship in a quitline setting. Data were obtained from 14,296 adults who were enrolled in a state quitline between January 2011 and July 2016. This study investigated whether cessation rates varied by changes in home smoking ban implementation between enrollment and 7-month follow-up. The impact of changes in home smoking bans on cessation at follow-up was significantly modified by having other smokers living in the home at follow-up (P < 0.0001). Among callers who did not live with other smokers in the home, the highest odds ratio of 30-day cessation was for callers who reported bans at follow-up only (OR = 10.50, 95%CI: 8.00, 13.70), followed by callers who reported bans at both enrollment and follow-up (OR = 8.02, 95%CI: 6.27, 10.30) and callers who reported bans at enrollment only (OR = 2.06, 95% CI: 1.47, 2.89) compared with callers with no home smoking bans. When callers reported that they lived with other smokers in the home, the effect of home smoking bans on cessation was much smaller. Quitlines should support the implementation of home smoking bans as a part of callers' goal setting activities to achieve tobacco cessation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)345-355
Number of pages11
JournalHealth education research
Volume34
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2019

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Tobacco Use Cessation
ban
nicotine
smoking
Smoking
Withholding Treatment
Odds Ratio

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Impact of changes in home smoking bans on tobacco cessation among quitline callers. / Yuan, Nicole P; Nair, Uma S.; Crane, Tracy E.; Krupski, Laurie; Collins, Bradley N.; Bell, Melanie L.

In: Health education research, Vol. 34, No. 3, 01.06.2019, p. 345-355.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yuan, Nicole P ; Nair, Uma S. ; Crane, Tracy E. ; Krupski, Laurie ; Collins, Bradley N. ; Bell, Melanie L. / Impact of changes in home smoking bans on tobacco cessation among quitline callers. In: Health education research. 2019 ; Vol. 34, No. 3. pp. 345-355.
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