Impact of the 80-hour workweek on patient care at a level I trauma center

Ali Salim, Pedro G R Teixeira, Linda Chan, Didem Oncel, Kenji Inaba, Carlos Brown, Peter M Rhee, Thomas V. Berne

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

55 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hypothesis: The 80-hour workweek limitation for surgical residents is associated with an increase in mortality and complication rates among adult trauma surgical patients. Design: Retrospective cohort study. Setting: Academic level I trauma center. Patients: Trauma patients admitted before and after the 80-hour workweek limitation. Methods: We compared death and complication rates for adult trauma patients admitted during a 24-month period before (2001-2003) and a 24-month period after (2004-2006) implementation of the 80-hour workweek at our institution. Relative risk and its 95% confidence intervals were examined. Main Outcome Measures: Patient care outcomes included preventable and nonpreventable complications and deaths. Results: The patient populations from the 2 time periods were clinically similar. No significant differences were found in the total and the preventable death rates. The time period after the 80-hour workweek mandate had a significantly higher total complication rate (5.64% vs 7.28%; relative risk, 1.29; 95% confidence interval, 1.15-1.45; P < .001), preventable complication rate (0.89% vs 1.28%; relative risk, 1.43; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-1.91; P = .02), and nonpreventable complication rate (4.75% vs 5.81%; relative risk, 1.22; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-1.39; P =.002). Conclusion: Although there was no difference in deaths between the 2 time periods, there was a significant increase in total, preventable, and nonpreventable complications. This increase in complication rate may be due, in part, to the new 80-hour workweek policy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)708-712
Number of pages5
JournalArchives of Surgery
Volume142
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Trauma Centers
Patient Care
Confidence Intervals
Mortality
Wounds and Injuries
Cohort Studies
Retrospective Studies
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Salim, A., Teixeira, P. G. R., Chan, L., Oncel, D., Inaba, K., Brown, C., ... Berne, T. V. (2007). Impact of the 80-hour workweek on patient care at a level I trauma center. Archives of Surgery, 142(8), 708-712. https://doi.org/10.1001/archsurg.142.8.708

Impact of the 80-hour workweek on patient care at a level I trauma center. / Salim, Ali; Teixeira, Pedro G R; Chan, Linda; Oncel, Didem; Inaba, Kenji; Brown, Carlos; Rhee, Peter M; Berne, Thomas V.

In: Archives of Surgery, Vol. 142, No. 8, 08.2007, p. 708-712.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Salim, A, Teixeira, PGR, Chan, L, Oncel, D, Inaba, K, Brown, C, Rhee, PM & Berne, TV 2007, 'Impact of the 80-hour workweek on patient care at a level I trauma center', Archives of Surgery, vol. 142, no. 8, pp. 708-712. https://doi.org/10.1001/archsurg.142.8.708
Salim A, Teixeira PGR, Chan L, Oncel D, Inaba K, Brown C et al. Impact of the 80-hour workweek on patient care at a level I trauma center. Archives of Surgery. 2007 Aug;142(8):708-712. https://doi.org/10.1001/archsurg.142.8.708
Salim, Ali ; Teixeira, Pedro G R ; Chan, Linda ; Oncel, Didem ; Inaba, Kenji ; Brown, Carlos ; Rhee, Peter M ; Berne, Thomas V. / Impact of the 80-hour workweek on patient care at a level I trauma center. In: Archives of Surgery. 2007 ; Vol. 142, No. 8. pp. 708-712.
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