Implementation of an Interprofessional Medication Therapy Management Experience

Katherine E. Schussel, Stephanie Forbes, Ann M. Taylor, Janet Heather Cooley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective. To measure the impact of an interprofessional experience (IPE) in medication therapy management (MTM) on students' attitudes and skills regarding interprofessional collaboration (IPC). Methods. This interprofessional MTM experience spanned three weeks, with health science students (medicine, nursing, nutrition, and pharmacy) meeting once weekly. The IPE facilitated interprofessional student collaboration via small-group sessions to conduct MTM consultations for patients with complex chronic conditions. Student learning and attitudinal changes were evaluated by comparing pre- and post-IPE survey responses and a qualitative summary of the students' clinical recommendations. Efficacy of student groups was measured via patient satisfaction surveys and was reported by frequency of response. Results. Twenty-seven students participated in the program and 22 completed both pre- and post-IPE surveys (81% response rate). The survey included open-ended and Likert-type items assessing students' attitudes and skills regarding the IPE as well as their reactions to the experience. Significant changes were observed for two attitudinal items regarding interprofessional teams: maintaining enthusiasm/interest and responsiveness to patients' emotional and financial needs. Patient-reported satisfaction and students' complex clinical recommendations provided further evidence of student learning. Conclusion. This novel IPE in MTM promoted interprofessional collaboration and education in this unique patient care area. Students' attitudes toward and skills in interprofessional collaboration improved, and the patients who received care reported positive experiences. Many health professions programs face challenges in meeting IPE requirements. The results of our study may provide the impetus for other institutions to develop similar programs to meet this urgent need.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Number of pages1
JournalAmerican journal of pharmaceutical education
Volume83
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2019

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Medication Therapy Management
medication
Students
management
experience
student
Patient Satisfaction
Learning
Health Occupations
Nursing Students
health science
patient care
Patient Care
small group
learning
nutrition
Referral and Consultation

Keywords

  • interprofessional collaboration
  • interprofessional education
  • interprofessional rotations/experiences
  • medication therapy management

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

Cite this

Implementation of an Interprofessional Medication Therapy Management Experience. / Schussel, Katherine E.; Forbes, Stephanie; Taylor, Ann M.; Cooley, Janet Heather.

In: American journal of pharmaceutical education, Vol. 83, No. 3, 01.04.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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