Implicit bias toward people with mental illness

A systematic literature review

Jayci Robb, Jeffrey A Stone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of the current review was to form a comprehensive understanding of implicit bias regarding mental illness. An extensive search was conducted using reference lists and multiple academic databases. Nineteen articles were selected and analyzed in terms of participant characteristics, implicit measure designs, implicit-explicit attitude correlations, and potential moderators of implicit bias. Overall, participants showed implicit bias against people with mental illness. Correlations between participants' implicit and explicit responses were inconsistent. Further, interventions and personal contact did not prove to be significant moderators of participants' implicit bias. Implications and future directions for research in the area are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3-13
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Rehabilitation
Volume82
Issue number4
StatePublished - Oct 1 2016

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Implicit bias toward people with mental illness : A systematic literature review. / Robb, Jayci; Stone, Jeffrey A.

In: Journal of Rehabilitation, Vol. 82, No. 4, 01.10.2016, p. 3-13.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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