Importance of the duration of inadequate coronary perfusion pressure on resuscitation from cardiac arrest

Arthur B. Sanders, Karl B. Kern, Matthew Atlas, Steven Bragg, Gordon A. Ewy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

139 Scopus citations

Abstract

The effect of the duration of inadequate coronary perfusion pressure on resuscitation from cardiac arrest was examined in 32 mongrel dogs with a mean weight of 22 ± 5 kg. In all dogs, the heart was electrically fibrillated and closed chest compression with assisted ventilation was performed for 15 minutes. At this time, all dogs had an inadequate coronary perfusion pressure (mean 7 ± 9 mm Hg) and were randomized to a control group (group 1) with continued closed chest compression or to one of the three groups with open chest cardiac massage. These three groups differed only in the duration of continued closed chest compression before initiation of open chest massage (15, 20 and 25 minutes, respectively, in groups 2, 3 and 4). The control group (group 1) had no significant increase in coronary perfusion pressure, and only one of the eight dogs could be resuscitated. The three groups with open chest cardiac massage had a significant increase in coronary perfusion pressure (from 5 ± 9 to 51 ± 26 mm Hg, p < 0.05), but the rate of successful resuscitation depended on the duration of inadequate coronary perfusion pressure before cardiac open chest massage. In group 2, six of eight dogs were resuscitated (p < 0.05 compared with the control group); in group 3, three of eight dogs were resuscitated and in group 4 none of the eight dogs was resuscitated. The resuscitation rate was significantly (p<0.05) greater in group 2 than in group 4. These findings indicate that techniques that improve coronary perfusion pressure during cardiopulmonary resuscitation must be applied before extensive myocardial cellular dysfunction occurs if the probability of successful resuscitation is to be improved.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)113-118
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American College of Cardiology
Volume6
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1985

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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