Improvement of insulin-stimulated glucose-disposal in type 2 diabetes after repeated parenteral administration of thioctic acid

S. Jacob, Erik J Henriksen, H. J. Tritschler, H. J. Augustin, G. J. Dietze

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

116 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Insulin resistance of skeletal muscle glucose uptake is a prominent feature of Type II diabetes (NIDDM); therefore, pharmacological intervention should aim to improve insulin sensitivity. Thioctic acid (TA), a naturally occurring compound, was shown to enhance glucose utilization in various experimental models after acute and chronic administration. It also increased insulin-stimulated glucose disposal in patients with NIDDM after acute administration. This pilot study was initiated to see whether this compound also augments glucose disposal in humans after repeated treatment. Twenty patients with NIDDM received TA (500 mg/ 500 ml NaCl, 0.9%) as daily infusions over a period of ten days. A hyperinsulinaemic, isoglycaemic glucose-clamp was done on day 0 and day 11. Parenteral administration of TA resulted in a significant increase of insulin-stimulated glucose-disposal by about 30% (metabolic clearance rate for glucose, 2.5 ± 0.3 vs. 3.2 ± 0.4 ml/kg/min and insulin-sensitivity-index: 3.5 ± 0.5 vs. 4.7 ± 0.4 mg/kg/μU/ml; p < 0.05, Wilcoxon-Rank-Sum-Test). There were no changes in fasting plasma levels for glucose or insulin; this can be explained, however by the short period of treatment and observation. This is the first clinical study to show that a ten day administration of TA is able to improve resistance of insulin-stimulated glucose disposal in NIDDM. Experimental data suggest several mechanisms in the mode of action. As the present investigation was an uncontrolled pilot trial, the encouraging results call for controlled studies to further elucidate the clinical relevance of the findings and the mode of action of this compound.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)284-288
Number of pages5
JournalExperimental and Clinical Endocrinology and Diabetes
Volume104
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1996

Fingerprint

Thioctic Acid
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Insulin
Glucose
Insulin Resistance
Nonparametric Statistics
Metabolic Clearance Rate
Glucose Clamp Technique
Fasting
Skeletal Muscle
Theoretical Models
Observation
Pharmacology
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Alpha lipoic acid
  • Glucose disposal
  • Insulin resistance
  • NIDDM

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Improvement of insulin-stimulated glucose-disposal in type 2 diabetes after repeated parenteral administration of thioctic acid. / Jacob, S.; Henriksen, Erik J; Tritschler, H. J.; Augustin, H. J.; Dietze, G. J.

In: Experimental and Clinical Endocrinology and Diabetes, Vol. 104, No. 3, 1996, p. 284-288.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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