In situ fabrication of three-dimensional chemical patterns in fused silica separation capillaries with polymerized phospholipids

Eric E. Ross, Elisabeth Mansfield, Yiding Huang, Craig A Aspinwall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We report a new molecular approach for in situ generation of micron scale, chemically and biochemically functionalized patterns inside three-dimensional, completely enclosed fluidic channels. The formation of chemical patterns is based upon a combination of lipid bilayer self-assembly and UV photopolymerization of photoreactive, cross-linkable phospholipids. Using this approach, we have functionalized capillaries of varying inner diameters with a range of chemistries useful for protein and peptide immobilization. Here, we demonstrate the ability to produce small molecule and protein-based chemical patterns.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)16756-16757
Number of pages2
JournalJournal of the American Chemical Society
Volume127
Issue number48
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 7 2005

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Phospholipids
Fused silica
Silicon Dioxide
Proteins
Fabrication
Lipid bilayers
Photopolymerization
Lipid Bilayers
Fluidics
Immobilization
Self assembly
Peptides
Molecules

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)

Cite this

In situ fabrication of three-dimensional chemical patterns in fused silica separation capillaries with polymerized phospholipids. / Ross, Eric E.; Mansfield, Elisabeth; Huang, Yiding; Aspinwall, Craig A.

In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, Vol. 127, No. 48, 07.12.2005, p. 16756-16757.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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