In vitro effect of Reiki treatment on bacterial cultures

Role of experimental context and practitioner well-being

Beverly Rubik, Audrey J. Brooks, Gary E Schwartz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To measure effects of Reiki treatments on growth of heat-shocked bacteria, and to determine the influence of healing context and practitioner well-being. Methods: Overnight cultures of Escherichia coli K12 in fresh medium were used. Culture samples were paired with controls to minimize any ordering effects. Samples were heat-shocked prior to Reiki treatment, which was performed by Reiki practitioners for up to 15 minutes, with untreated controls. Plate-count assay using an automated colony counter determined the number of viable bacteria. Fourteen Reiki practitioners each completed 3 runs (n = 42 runs) without healing context, and another 2 runs (n = 28 runs) in which they first treated a pain patient for 30 minutes (healing context). Well-being questionnaires were administered to practitioners pre-post all sessions. Results: No overall difference was found between the Reiki and control plates in the nonhealing context. In the healing context, the Reiki treated cultures overall exhibited significantly more bacteria than controls (p < 0.05). Practitioner social (p < 0.013) and emotional well-being (p < 0.021) correlated with Reiki treatment outcome on bacterial cultures in the nonhealing context. Practitioner social (p < 0.031), physical (p < 0.030), and emotional (p < 0.026) well-being correlated with Reiki treatment outcome on the bacterial cultures in the healing context. For practitioners starting with diminished well-being, control counts were likely to be higher than Reiki-treated bacterial counts. For practitioners starting with a higher level of well-being, Reiki counts were likely to be higher than control counts. Conclusions: Reiki improved growth of heat-shocked bacterial cultures in a healing context. The initial level of well-being of the Reiki practitioners correlates with the outcome of Reiki on bacterial culture growth and is key to the results obtained.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)7-13
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2006

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Therapeutic Touch
Therapeutics
Hot Temperature
Bacteria
In Vitro Techniques
Growth
Escherichia coli K12
Bacterial Load

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Complementary and alternative medicine
  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

In vitro effect of Reiki treatment on bacterial cultures : Role of experimental context and practitioner well-being. / Rubik, Beverly; Brooks, Audrey J.; Schwartz, Gary E.

In: Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, Vol. 12, No. 1, 01.2006, p. 7-13.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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