In vivo multi-modality photoacoustic and pulse echo tracking of prostate tumor growth using a window chamber

Daniel R. Bauer, Ragnar Olafsson, Leonardo G. Montilla, Russell S Witte

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Understanding the tumor microenvironment is critical to characterizing how cancers operate and predicting how they will eventually respond to treatment. The mouse window chamber model is an excellent tool for cancer research, because it enables high resolution tumor imaging and cross-validation using multiple modalities. We describe a novel multimodality imaging system that incorporates three dimensional (3D) photoacoustics with pulse echo ultrasound for imaging the tumor microenvironment and tracking tissue growth in mice. Three mice were implanted with a dorsal skin flap window chamber. PC-3 prostate tumor cells, expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP), were injected into the skin. The ensuing tumor invasion was mapped using photoacoustic and pulse echo imaging, as well as optical and fluorescent imaging for comparison and cross validation. The photoacoustic imaging and spectroscopy system, consisting of a tunable (680-1000nm) pulsed laser and 25 MHz ultrasound transducer, revealed near infrared absorbing regions, primarily blood vessels. Pulse echo images, obtained simultaneously, provided details of the tumor microstructure and growth with 100-μm3 resolution. The tumor size in all three mice increased between three and five fold during 3+ weeks of imaging. Results were consistent with the optical and fluorescent images. Photoacoustic imaging revealed detailed maps of the tumor vasculature, whereas photoacoustic spectroscopy identified regions of oxygenated and deoxygenated blood vessels. The 3D photoacoustic and pulse echo imaging system provided complementary information to track the tumor microenvironment, evaluate new cancer therapies, and develop molecular imaging agents in vivo. Finally, these safe and noninvasive techniques are potentially applicable for human cancer imaging.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProgress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE
Volume7564
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010
EventPhotons Plus Ultrasound: Imaging and Sensing 2010 - San Francisco, CA, United States
Duration: Jan 24 2010Jan 26 2010

Other

OtherPhotons Plus Ultrasound: Imaging and Sensing 2010
CountryUnited States
CitySan Francisco, CA
Period1/24/101/26/10

Fingerprint

Photoacoustic effect
Pulse
Tumors
Prostate
echoes
tumors
chambers
Imaging techniques
Growth
pulses
Neoplasms
mice
Tumor Microenvironment
cancer
blood vessels
Blood vessels
Imaging systems
Skin
Blood Vessels
Ultrasonics

Keywords

  • Angiogenesis
  • Cancer biology
  • GFP
  • Green fluorescent protein
  • Optoacoustic
  • Prostate cancer
  • Ultrasound
  • Window chamber

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Biomaterials
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Bauer, D. R., Olafsson, R., Montilla, L. G., & Witte, R. S. (2010). In vivo multi-modality photoacoustic and pulse echo tracking of prostate tumor growth using a window chamber. In Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE (Vol. 7564). [75643B] https://doi.org/10.1117/12.843875

In vivo multi-modality photoacoustic and pulse echo tracking of prostate tumor growth using a window chamber. / Bauer, Daniel R.; Olafsson, Ragnar; Montilla, Leonardo G.; Witte, Russell S.

Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. Vol. 7564 2010. 75643B.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Bauer, DR, Olafsson, R, Montilla, LG & Witte, RS 2010, In vivo multi-modality photoacoustic and pulse echo tracking of prostate tumor growth using a window chamber. in Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. vol. 7564, 75643B, Photons Plus Ultrasound: Imaging and Sensing 2010, San Francisco, CA, United States, 1/24/10. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.843875
Bauer DR, Olafsson R, Montilla LG, Witte RS. In vivo multi-modality photoacoustic and pulse echo tracking of prostate tumor growth using a window chamber. In Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. Vol. 7564. 2010. 75643B https://doi.org/10.1117/12.843875
Bauer, Daniel R. ; Olafsson, Ragnar ; Montilla, Leonardo G. ; Witte, Russell S. / In vivo multi-modality photoacoustic and pulse echo tracking of prostate tumor growth using a window chamber. Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. Vol. 7564 2010.
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