Incidence and clinical significance of CDKN2/MTS1/P16(ink4a) and MTS2/P15(ink4b) gene deletions in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

Muxiang Zhou, Lubing Gu, Andrew M. Yeager, Harry W. Findley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Scopus citations

Abstract

We have examined the incidence and clinical significance of deletions of two candidate tumor suppressor genes, CDKN2/MTS1/p16(ink4A) and MTS2/p15(ink4B), in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Gene deletion was evaluated in leukemic bone marrow (BM) cells obtained at diagnosis from 105 pediatric ALL patients: 83 with B-cell precursor (BCP- ALL) ALL and 22 with T-ALL. CDKN2/p16 deletion was seen in 23 of the 83 (28%) BCP-ALL and 15 of the 22 (68%) T-ALL cases. A virtually identical pattern of MTS2/p15 deletion was detected in these patients: p15 was deleted in 37 of 38 cases with p16 deletion, and p15 was not deleted in any p16-positive specimens. P16/p15 deletions were significantly related to poor prognosis factors including age under 1 year (P < 0.001), initial white cell counts greater than 50 x 109 per liter (P < .001), and T cell phenotype P < .005). Analysis of all 105 patients revealed that the 5-year disease-free survival rate was 68% for patients without p16/p15 deletions and 35% for those with p16/p15 deletions (P < .005). The association between gene deletion at initial diagnosis and unfavorable outcome suggests that loss of these genes is clinically significant and indicates a need for prospective studies of p16/p15 deletion in pediatric ALL patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)141-150
Number of pages10
JournalPediatric Hematology and Oncology
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997

Keywords

  • p16/p15gene deletion
  • pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Hematology
  • Oncology

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