Incidence of systemic lupus erythematosus: Race and gender differences

Daniel J. McCarty, Susan Manzi, Thomas A. Medsger, Rosalind Ramsey-Goldman, Ronald E. LaPorte, Chian K Kwoh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

306 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. To examine racial differences in the incidence of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods. A population-based registry of SLE patients in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, was used to identify incident cases of SLE diagnosed between January 1, 1985 and December 31, 1990, from 3 sources, by medical record review (University of Pittsburgh Lupus Databank, rheumatologists, and hospitals). Capture-recapture methods using log-linear models were used to estimate the level of case-finding and to calculate 95 % confidence intervals (CI). Incidence rates were calculated per 100,000 population. Results. A total of 191 definite and 78 probable incident cases of SLE were identified, and the overall annual incidence rates were 2.4 (95% CI 2.1-2.8) and 1.0 (95% CI 0.8-1.3), respectively. The crude incidence rates of definite SLE were 0.4 for white males, 3.5 for white females, 0.7 for African-American males, and 9.2 for African-American females. The annual incidence rates of definite SLE remained fairly constant over the study interval. African-American females with definite SLE had a younger mean age at diagnosis compared with white females (P < 0.05). Since the overall ascertainment rate was high (85%; 95% CI 78-92%), the ascertainment-corrected incidence rate for definite SLE, 2.8 (95% CI 2.6-3.2), was similar to the crude rate. Conclusion. Our rates clearly confirm previous reports of an excess incidence of SLE among females compared with males and among African- Americans compared with whites. We have used capture-recapture methods to improve the accuracy of SLE incidence rates, and we advocate their use to facilitate comparisons across studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1260-1270
Number of pages11
JournalArthritis and Rheumatism
Volume38
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1995
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
Incidence
African Americans
Confidence Intervals
Population
Medical Records
Registries
Linear Models
Databases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Rheumatology

Cite this

McCarty, D. J., Manzi, S., Medsger, T. A., Ramsey-Goldman, R., LaPorte, R. E., & Kwoh, C. K. (1995). Incidence of systemic lupus erythematosus: Race and gender differences. Arthritis and Rheumatism, 38(9), 1260-1270. https://doi.org/10.1002/art.1780380914

Incidence of systemic lupus erythematosus : Race and gender differences. / McCarty, Daniel J.; Manzi, Susan; Medsger, Thomas A.; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; LaPorte, Ronald E.; Kwoh, Chian K.

In: Arthritis and Rheumatism, Vol. 38, No. 9, 09.1995, p. 1260-1270.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McCarty, DJ, Manzi, S, Medsger, TA, Ramsey-Goldman, R, LaPorte, RE & Kwoh, CK 1995, 'Incidence of systemic lupus erythematosus: Race and gender differences', Arthritis and Rheumatism, vol. 38, no. 9, pp. 1260-1270. https://doi.org/10.1002/art.1780380914
McCarty, Daniel J. ; Manzi, Susan ; Medsger, Thomas A. ; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind ; LaPorte, Ronald E. ; Kwoh, Chian K. / Incidence of systemic lupus erythematosus : Race and gender differences. In: Arthritis and Rheumatism. 1995 ; Vol. 38, No. 9. pp. 1260-1270.
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abstract = "Objective. To examine racial differences in the incidence of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods. A population-based registry of SLE patients in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, was used to identify incident cases of SLE diagnosed between January 1, 1985 and December 31, 1990, from 3 sources, by medical record review (University of Pittsburgh Lupus Databank, rheumatologists, and hospitals). Capture-recapture methods using log-linear models were used to estimate the level of case-finding and to calculate 95 {\%} confidence intervals (CI). Incidence rates were calculated per 100,000 population. Results. A total of 191 definite and 78 probable incident cases of SLE were identified, and the overall annual incidence rates were 2.4 (95{\%} CI 2.1-2.8) and 1.0 (95{\%} CI 0.8-1.3), respectively. The crude incidence rates of definite SLE were 0.4 for white males, 3.5 for white females, 0.7 for African-American males, and 9.2 for African-American females. The annual incidence rates of definite SLE remained fairly constant over the study interval. African-American females with definite SLE had a younger mean age at diagnosis compared with white females (P < 0.05). Since the overall ascertainment rate was high (85{\%}; 95{\%} CI 78-92{\%}), the ascertainment-corrected incidence rate for definite SLE, 2.8 (95{\%} CI 2.6-3.2), was similar to the crude rate. Conclusion. Our rates clearly confirm previous reports of an excess incidence of SLE among females compared with males and among African- Americans compared with whites. We have used capture-recapture methods to improve the accuracy of SLE incidence rates, and we advocate their use to facilitate comparisons across studies.",
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