Increased Akt signaling in the mosquito fat body increases adult survivorship

Anam J. Arik, Lewis V. Hun, Kendra Quicke, Michael Piatt, Rolf Ziegler, Patricia Y. Scaraffia, Hemant Badgandi, Michael A Riehle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Akt signaling regulates diverse physiologies in a wide range of organisms. We examine the impact of increased Akt signaling in the fat body of 2 mosquito species, the Asian malaria mosquito Anopheles stephensi and the yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti. Overexpression of a myristoylated and active form of A. stephensi and Ae. aegypti Akt in the fat body of transgenic mosquitoes led to activation of the downstream signaling molecules forkhead box O (FOXO) and p70 S6 kinase in a tissue and blood meal-specific manner. In both species, increased Akt signaling in the fat body after blood feeding significantly increased adult survivorship relative to nontransgenic sibling controls. In A. stephensi, survivorship was increased by 15% to 45%, while in Ae. aegypti, it increased 14% to 47%. Transgenic mosquitoes fed only sugar, and thus not expressing active Akt, had no significant difference in survivorship relative to nontransgenic siblings. Expression of active Akt also increased expression of fat body vitellogenin, but the number of viable eggs did not differ significantly between transgenic and nontransgenic controls. This work demonstrates a novel mechanism of enhanced survivorship through increased Akt signaling in the fat bodies of multiple mosquito genera and provides new tools to unlock the molecular underpinnings of aging in eukaryotic organisms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1404-1413
Number of pages10
JournalFASEB Journal
Volume29
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2015

Fingerprint

Fat Body
Culicidae
Fats
Blood
70-kDa Ribosomal Protein S6 Kinases
Vitellogenins
Physiology
Yellow Fever
Anopheles
Aedes
Sugars
Eggs
Aging of materials
Malaria
Chemical activation
Meals
Tissue
Molecules

Keywords

  • Aedes aegypti
  • Aging
  • Anopheles stephensi
  • Insulin signaling
  • Vitellogenin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Biotechnology
  • Genetics
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Arik, A. J., Hun, L. V., Quicke, K., Piatt, M., Ziegler, R., Scaraffia, P. Y., ... Riehle, M. A. (2015). Increased Akt signaling in the mosquito fat body increases adult survivorship. FASEB Journal, 29(4), 1404-1413. https://doi.org/10.1096/fj.14-261479

Increased Akt signaling in the mosquito fat body increases adult survivorship. / Arik, Anam J.; Hun, Lewis V.; Quicke, Kendra; Piatt, Michael; Ziegler, Rolf; Scaraffia, Patricia Y.; Badgandi, Hemant; Riehle, Michael A.

In: FASEB Journal, Vol. 29, No. 4, 01.04.2015, p. 1404-1413.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Arik, AJ, Hun, LV, Quicke, K, Piatt, M, Ziegler, R, Scaraffia, PY, Badgandi, H & Riehle, MA 2015, 'Increased Akt signaling in the mosquito fat body increases adult survivorship', FASEB Journal, vol. 29, no. 4, pp. 1404-1413. https://doi.org/10.1096/fj.14-261479
Arik AJ, Hun LV, Quicke K, Piatt M, Ziegler R, Scaraffia PY et al. Increased Akt signaling in the mosquito fat body increases adult survivorship. FASEB Journal. 2015 Apr 1;29(4):1404-1413. https://doi.org/10.1096/fj.14-261479
Arik, Anam J. ; Hun, Lewis V. ; Quicke, Kendra ; Piatt, Michael ; Ziegler, Rolf ; Scaraffia, Patricia Y. ; Badgandi, Hemant ; Riehle, Michael A. / Increased Akt signaling in the mosquito fat body increases adult survivorship. In: FASEB Journal. 2015 ; Vol. 29, No. 4. pp. 1404-1413.
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