Increasing frequency of staphylococcal infective endocarditis: Experience at a University Hospital, 1981 through 1988

Tomas J. Sanabria, Joseph S Alpert, Robert Goldberg, Linda A. Pape, Sarah H. Cheeseman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

108 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To determine the characteristics of infective endocarditis in our hospital, we reviewed all patients with that diagnosis at the University of Massachusetts Medical Center, Worcester, between 1981 and 1988. Of 113 patients with infective endocarditis, 56 (50%) had staphylococcal endocarditis. Despite aggressive medical and surgical therapy, in-hospital mortality was 25%. Forty-five (80%) of the 56 cases of staphylococcal endocarditis involved Staphylococcus aureus with a mortality of 28% vs 9% in the non-S aureus group. Mortality was higher in patients with congestive heart failure (35%), atrioventricular block (45%), atrial fibrillation (42%), and prosthetic valve endocarditis (50%). Seventy-six percent of the patients with congestive heart failure required surgery. Patients with congestive heart failure and S aureus infection had a mortality of 45%. Thirty-six patients (64%) were alive at late follow-up (mean, 28.6 months). Mortality was highest (23%) during the first 3 months following diagnosis of staphylococcal endocarditis. Staphylococcal endocarditis represents an increasingly large proportion of patients with infectious endocarditis. Mortality rates remain high despite aggressive management of the patient's condition.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1305-1309
Number of pages5
JournalArchives of Internal Medicine
Volume150
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jun 1990
Externally publishedYes

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Endocarditis
Mortality
Heart Failure
Atrioventricular Block
Hospital Mortality
Atrial Fibrillation
Staphylococcus aureus
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Increasing frequency of staphylococcal infective endocarditis : Experience at a University Hospital, 1981 through 1988. / Sanabria, Tomas J.; Alpert, Joseph S; Goldberg, Robert; Pape, Linda A.; Cheeseman, Sarah H.

In: Archives of Internal Medicine, Vol. 150, No. 6, 06.1990, p. 1305-1309.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sanabria, Tomas J. ; Alpert, Joseph S ; Goldberg, Robert ; Pape, Linda A. ; Cheeseman, Sarah H. / Increasing frequency of staphylococcal infective endocarditis : Experience at a University Hospital, 1981 through 1988. In: Archives of Internal Medicine. 1990 ; Vol. 150, No. 6. pp. 1305-1309.
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