Independent practice

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

With the beginning of his private practice in March of 1952, Paul Rudolph was eager to purge himself of the Twitchell legacy and move in another direction. His work during this period was expanding into the public realm alongside a steady stream of residential commissions. Guest lectureships and studio critic invitations from Harvard, Yale, Cornell, and the University of Pennsylvania became increasingly frequent. Rudolph was tenuously straddling the line between a local culture that nurtured his early development and a national architectural scene that offered him greater opportunity. The break with Twitchell offered Rudolph unbridled independence but also signaled a period of restless experimentation in his work. He started into the prosperous 1950s with a series of projects that attempted to redefine architecture for his generation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationPaul Rudolph the Florida Houses
PublisherPrinceton Archit.Press
Pages121-150
Number of pages30
ISBN (Print)1568985517, 9781568985510
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2005
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

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  • Cite this

    Domin, C. (2005). Independent practice. In Paul Rudolph the Florida Houses (pp. 121-150). Princeton Archit.Press. https://doi.org/10.1007/1-56898-647-5_4