Indications and use of palliative surgery

Results of Society of Surgical Oncology survey

Laurence E. McCahill, Robert S Krouse, David Chu, Gloria Juarez, Gwen C. Uman, Betty Ferrell, Lawrence D. Wagman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

69 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Despite increasing attention to end-of-life care in oncology, palliative surgery (PS) remains poorly defined. A survey to test the definition, assess the extent of use, and evaluate attitudes and goals of surgeons regarding PS was devised. Methods: A survey of Society of Surgical Oncology (SSO) members. Results: 419 SSO members completed a 110-item survey. Surgeons estimated 21% of their cancer surgeries as palliative in nature. Forty-three percent of respondents felt PS was best defined based on pre-operative intent, 27% based on post-operative factors, and 30% on patient prognosis. Only 43% considered estimated patient survival time an important factor in defining PS, and 22% considered 5-year survival rate important. The vast majority (95%) considered tumor still evident following surgery in a patient with poor prognosis constituted PS. Most surgeons felt PS could be procedures due to generalized illness related to cancer (80%) or related to cancer treatment complications (76%). Patient symptom relief and pain relief were identified as the two most important goals in PS, with increased survival the least important. Conclusion: PS is a major portion of surgical oncology practice. Quality-of-life parameters, not patient survival, were identified as the most important goals of PS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)104-112
Number of pages9
JournalAnnals of Surgical Oncology
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Palliative Care
Survival
Surveys and Questionnaires
Neoplasms
Terminal Care
Second Primary Neoplasms
Survival Rate
Quality of Life
Pain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Oncology

Cite this

Indications and use of palliative surgery : Results of Society of Surgical Oncology survey. / McCahill, Laurence E.; Krouse, Robert S; Chu, David; Juarez, Gloria; Uman, Gwen C.; Ferrell, Betty; Wagman, Lawrence D.

In: Annals of Surgical Oncology, Vol. 9, No. 1, 2002, p. 104-112.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McCahill, Laurence E. ; Krouse, Robert S ; Chu, David ; Juarez, Gloria ; Uman, Gwen C. ; Ferrell, Betty ; Wagman, Lawrence D. / Indications and use of palliative surgery : Results of Society of Surgical Oncology survey. In: Annals of Surgical Oncology. 2002 ; Vol. 9, No. 1. pp. 104-112.
@article{923b297f842a4fe3ae58ca5babdb001d,
title = "Indications and use of palliative surgery: Results of Society of Surgical Oncology survey",
abstract = "Background: Despite increasing attention to end-of-life care in oncology, palliative surgery (PS) remains poorly defined. A survey to test the definition, assess the extent of use, and evaluate attitudes and goals of surgeons regarding PS was devised. Methods: A survey of Society of Surgical Oncology (SSO) members. Results: 419 SSO members completed a 110-item survey. Surgeons estimated 21{\%} of their cancer surgeries as palliative in nature. Forty-three percent of respondents felt PS was best defined based on pre-operative intent, 27{\%} based on post-operative factors, and 30{\%} on patient prognosis. Only 43{\%} considered estimated patient survival time an important factor in defining PS, and 22{\%} considered 5-year survival rate important. The vast majority (95{\%}) considered tumor still evident following surgery in a patient with poor prognosis constituted PS. Most surgeons felt PS could be procedures due to generalized illness related to cancer (80{\%}) or related to cancer treatment complications (76{\%}). Patient symptom relief and pain relief were identified as the two most important goals in PS, with increased survival the least important. Conclusion: PS is a major portion of surgical oncology practice. Quality-of-life parameters, not patient survival, were identified as the most important goals of PS.",
author = "McCahill, {Laurence E.} and Krouse, {Robert S} and David Chu and Gloria Juarez and Uman, {Gwen C.} and Betty Ferrell and Wagman, {Lawrence D.}",
year = "2002",
doi = "10.1245/aso.2002.9.1.104",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "9",
pages = "104--112",
journal = "Annals of Surgical Oncology",
issn = "1068-9265",
publisher = "Springer New York",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Indications and use of palliative surgery

T2 - Results of Society of Surgical Oncology survey

AU - McCahill, Laurence E.

AU - Krouse, Robert S

AU - Chu, David

AU - Juarez, Gloria

AU - Uman, Gwen C.

AU - Ferrell, Betty

AU - Wagman, Lawrence D.

PY - 2002

Y1 - 2002

N2 - Background: Despite increasing attention to end-of-life care in oncology, palliative surgery (PS) remains poorly defined. A survey to test the definition, assess the extent of use, and evaluate attitudes and goals of surgeons regarding PS was devised. Methods: A survey of Society of Surgical Oncology (SSO) members. Results: 419 SSO members completed a 110-item survey. Surgeons estimated 21% of their cancer surgeries as palliative in nature. Forty-three percent of respondents felt PS was best defined based on pre-operative intent, 27% based on post-operative factors, and 30% on patient prognosis. Only 43% considered estimated patient survival time an important factor in defining PS, and 22% considered 5-year survival rate important. The vast majority (95%) considered tumor still evident following surgery in a patient with poor prognosis constituted PS. Most surgeons felt PS could be procedures due to generalized illness related to cancer (80%) or related to cancer treatment complications (76%). Patient symptom relief and pain relief were identified as the two most important goals in PS, with increased survival the least important. Conclusion: PS is a major portion of surgical oncology practice. Quality-of-life parameters, not patient survival, were identified as the most important goals of PS.

AB - Background: Despite increasing attention to end-of-life care in oncology, palliative surgery (PS) remains poorly defined. A survey to test the definition, assess the extent of use, and evaluate attitudes and goals of surgeons regarding PS was devised. Methods: A survey of Society of Surgical Oncology (SSO) members. Results: 419 SSO members completed a 110-item survey. Surgeons estimated 21% of their cancer surgeries as palliative in nature. Forty-three percent of respondents felt PS was best defined based on pre-operative intent, 27% based on post-operative factors, and 30% on patient prognosis. Only 43% considered estimated patient survival time an important factor in defining PS, and 22% considered 5-year survival rate important. The vast majority (95%) considered tumor still evident following surgery in a patient with poor prognosis constituted PS. Most surgeons felt PS could be procedures due to generalized illness related to cancer (80%) or related to cancer treatment complications (76%). Patient symptom relief and pain relief were identified as the two most important goals in PS, with increased survival the least important. Conclusion: PS is a major portion of surgical oncology practice. Quality-of-life parameters, not patient survival, were identified as the most important goals of PS.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0036211704&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0036211704&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1245/aso.2002.9.1.104

DO - 10.1245/aso.2002.9.1.104

M3 - Article

VL - 9

SP - 104

EP - 112

JO - Annals of Surgical Oncology

JF - Annals of Surgical Oncology

SN - 1068-9265

IS - 1

ER -